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Evaluation of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 (2010-2012)

It has implications for policy makers, teachers, middle and senior leaders, principals, providers of professional learning, communities, Boards of Trustees, Ministry of Education staff and other government agencies.

"[An] excellent report", "as New Zealand moves forward with Ka Hikitia, I would hope that ... the data reported in Effectiveness of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5, 2010-12 will be considered  carefully" - Quality Assurance by Christine Sleeter, California State University.

Visit: Evaluation of Te Kotahitanga Phase 5 (2010-2012) Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) Programme

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  • Uptake and early implementation: Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako

    This report provides an overview of the early implementation of Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako (Communities of Learning) up to December 2016.

    Author(s): Research and Evaluation, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: April 2017

  • PISA 2015: New Zealand Students Wellbeing

    Students’ educational outcomes can be affected by a range of factors from inside and outside of the school grounds. For example, students who are motivated to succeed have high expectations for the future, and those who have a strong sense of belonging at school tend to have better academic outcomes. It is therefore vitally important that parents, educators and system leaders understand and act on these aspects of student wellbeing.

    In 2015, the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) measured these and other aspects of wellbeing among 15-year-olds across 70 countries. This report summarises the main results as they relate to New Zealand students. Where relevant, this report also triangulates information from other studies to provide a fuller understanding of student wellbeing.

    Author(s): Comparative Education Research Unit, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: April 2017

  • Te Rāngai Kāhui Ako ā-Iwi

    Te Rāngai Kāhui Ako ā-Iwi is a framework to support sustainable Māori medium education, recognising the diversity region by region, iwi by iwi. The Minister of Education introduced Te Rāngai Kahui Ako ā-Iwi on 10 March 2017 at the National Cross Sector Forum in Auckland.

    Author(s): Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: March 2017

  • PISA 2015: New Zealand headline results

    Scientific literacy was the major focus in PISA 2015 and reading and mathematics literacy the minor focuses. In New Zealand over 4,500 students from 183 schools took part in the study in July/August 2015.

    DISCLAIMER:

    “A prior version of these reports was published on the 6th December 2016. There was a minor error that has now been corrected. These reports are accurate as of 22 December 2016”.

    Author(s): Comparative Education Research Unit, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: December 2016

  • PISA 2015: The science context for PISA

    The findings presented come from the administration of PISA 2015 where the main domain was science and cover both science achievement and the context in which the science learning of 15-year-old students takes place. This report is divided into two main sections: student-related science outcomes and teaching-related science outcomes.

    The first section examines the motivation, attitudes, and beliefs of 15-year-old students with respect to science education, as well as their out of class experiences with science and expectations of future careers in science. The relationship between students’ achievement in science and their attitudes to and engagement with science are also examined, and comparisons are made by gender and main ethnic groupings.

    The second section looks at the situation in which science education occurs; namely the teaching practices used in the science classroom, and the qualifications and professional knowledge of those teaching science to our 15-year-olds.

    DISCLAIMER:

    “A prior version of these reports was published on the 6th December 2016. There was a minor error that has now been corrected. These reports are accurate as of 22 December 2016”.

    Author(s): Sarah Kirkham with Steve May, Comparative Education Research Unit, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: December 2016

  • PISA 2015: New Zealand Summary Report

    This summary report provides an overview of New Zealand results for science, reading and mathematics literacy in an international context. In addition this report looks at the overall trends in New Zealand achievement for each of these subjects as well as for priority learners (Māori, Pasifika and low socio-economic students).

    DISCLAIMER:

    “A prior version of these reports was published on the 6th December 2016. There was a minor error that has now been corrected. These reports are accurate as of 22 December 2016”.

    Author(s): Steve May with Jonathan Flockton and Sarah Kirkham, Comparative Education Research Unit, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: December 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume I: Student confidence and beliefs about their ability to learn maths

    This report focuses on the link between self-beliefs and maths achievement. It presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Average levels of learning beliefs among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average
    • Impact of learning beliefs on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in learning beliefs by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the learning beliefs of New Zealand students

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume II: How students approach learning

    This report focuses on the links between maths anxiety, openness to problem solving, perseverance and maths achievement. It presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Maths anxiety, openness to problem solving and perseverance among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of anxiety, openness to problem solving, and perseverance on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in anxiety, openness to problem solving, and perseverance evidence by gender, socio-economic background, and ethnicity.
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the learning approaches of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume III: Why students are motivated to learn maths

    This report focuses on the link between motivation to learn maths and maths achievement. Volume III presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Motivation to learn maths among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of motivation to learn maths on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in motivation to learn maths evident by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the motivation of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume IV: What students think about school

    This report focuses on the link between attitudes towards school and maths achievement. Volume IV presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Attitudes towards school among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of attitudes towards school on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in attitudes towards school evident by gender, socio-economic background, and ethnicity.
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the attitudes of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • How does New Zealand's education system compare? OECD's Education at a Glance 2016

    This report "How does New Zealand's education system compare?" draws on the New Zealand results in OECD's Education at a Glance 2016 and summarises the characteristics and performance of New Zealand's education system in an international context. This year's report relates to education in the 2014 or 2015 academic year and the 2013/2014 financial year.

    Author(s): Simon Crossan and David Scott, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: September 2016

  • Mathematics Support Teacher (MST) Programme 2014 School Research Overview Report

    The Mathematics Support Teacher (MST) programme started in 2012 as part of the Programmes for Students initiative . The MST programme provides release time for a teacher to work with groups of students with learning needs that require additional support to classroom teaching. The MST role is partly funded by the Ministry of Education.

    Author(s): Nicolette Edgar, Artemis Research. Report prepared for the Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: August 2016

  • Achievement Analysis 2014 Programmes for Students: Accelerating Learning in Literacy (ALL), Accelerating Learning in, Mathematics (ALiM), Mathematics Support Teacher (MST)

    This report presents a summary of student achievement analysis from Programmes for Students (PfS) 2014: Accelerating Learning in Mathematics (ALiM), Mathematics Support Teacher (MST) and Accelerating Learning in Literacy (ALL). The initiatives aim to accelerate progress of students below or well below the National Standards.

    Author(s): Analysis and Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: August 2016

  • Programmes for Students 2012: Report on Three Evaluative Studies

    This report presents the findings of three evaluative studies looking at the 2012 Literacy and Mathematics: Programmes for Students. Programmes for Students (PfS) is a Ministry of Education initiative providing primary schools with teacher release time to work with students who are assessed as below or well below the National Standards in mathematics, reading or writing. PfS uses the expertise within the school to accelerate the progress of these students.

    Author(s): Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: August 2016

  • Annual Evaluation Report for the Teach First NZ Programme

    The Teach First NZ pilot programme is an alternative field-based Initial Teacher Education (ITE) programme.1 The pilot programme operates between 2013 and 2016 with three annual intakes of up to 20 participants. The third and final intake included in this evaluation is Cohort 15 (beginning at the start of the 2015 school year).

    Author(s):

    Date Published: Varies

  • Incredible Years Teacher (IYT) programme

    Incredible Years Teacher (IYT)programme is a six session programme for teachers of children aged 3-8 years. It is based on strengthening teacher classroom management strategies, promoting children’s pro-social behaviour and school readiness, and reducing classroom aggression and non-cooperation with peers. IYT is delivered by Ministry staff together with key delivery partners – Resource Teachers Learning and Behaviour (RTLB). Programmes are also contracted to early childhood educators who deliver programmes to their sector.

    Author(s): Varies

    Date Published: Varies

  • 2015 Annual Evaluation Report for the Teach First NZ programme pilot

    Delivered in partnership with the University of Auckland

    This is the third annual evaluation report of the Teach First NZ programme pilot, delivered in partnership with the University of Auckland. It confirms that the Teach First NZ programme continues to be effectively and efficiently implemented. Teach First NZ and the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education continue to find ways to strengthen the programme and to ensure it is well known and well supported. Participants are strong ambassadors for the programme, including the mission of reducing educational inequalities. Almost all participants have made a valued contribution in their school, have supported their students to engage and progress, and intend to stay in teaching, at least in the short-term.

    Author(s): Jo MacDonald, Jenny Whatman and Liesje Stevens, New Zealand Council for Educational Research. Report prepared for the Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: August 2016

  • Patterns of student progress in the Intensive Wraparound Service

    Intensive Wraparound Service (IWS) is designed for the small number of children and young people with highly complex and challenging behaviour, social or education needs, including those with an intellectual difficulty. IWS in New Zealand is a relatively new and rapidly evolving service that began in 2009/2010. In 2014, IWS aimed to support up to 285 students with a further 50 students being supported through a combined IWS/Severe Behaviour Initiative. This evaluation focused on the IWS-only students and was designed to contribute to the further development of IWS. It is part of a wider evaluation designed to provide the Ministry of Education and sector stakeholders with a fuller understanding of how three of the key PB4L initiatives-School-Wide (SW), Incredible Years: Teachers (IYT) and the Intensive Wraparound Service (IWS)-are being implemented in New Zealand.

    Author(s): Jacky Burgon, Melanie Berg and Nicole Herdina, New Zealand Council for Educational Research. Report for the Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: March 2016

  • Innovations in Partnership Schools Kura Hourua

    The Ministry of Education has a clear focus on improving student achievement, and employs a range of approaches to support the sector’s efforts, including provision of strategic leadership, resources, and targeted interventions. Partnership Schools | Kura Hourua (PSKH) is a new policy that provides an innovative addition to this mix.

    Author(s): Martin, Jenkins & Associates. Report for the Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: Ocotober 2015

  • Insights for Teachers: How teachers and principals of Year 7-10 students use their time

    This is the second 'Insights for Teachers' focusing on TALIS.

    In this 'Insights for Teachers' we report on the activities of New Zealand teachers and principals, and the high levels of job satisfaction they reported in the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS).

    TALIS asked Year 7-10 teachers how they spent their time for a randomly chosen Year 7-10 class from their current timetable and how much work time they spent on various activities in a recent week. Their principals were asked about how they divided their time over a school year.

    Author(s): Chris Cockerill, Debra Taylor and Nicola Marshall, Evidence, Data and Knowledge, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: September 2015

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