Fees Free tertiary education: the first year, initial statistics

Statistics relating to the first year of fees-free tertiary education, including demographic data, student loan borrowing, course completions and study load.

This page provides information on the first year of the Fees Free Policy (2018). Because there is only one year of data available for fees-free, comparisons have been made either with non-fees-free students in the same year (2018) or with similar groups of past students, such as 18-19 year olds.

Key findings

  • In 2018 there were approximately 47,000 unique fees-free students and trainees, including 4,845 (10%) trainees in industry training.
  • Of the approximately 42,145 fees-free students in provider-based study in 2018, the majority (56%) were enrolled at universities, 68% were of European ethnicity, 69% were aged 18-19 years and 59% were women.
  • There was some evidence that the fees-free policy helped to stabilise the trend of declining tertiary enrolments in recent years. In 2018, the amount of study (equivalent full-time students or EFTS) at SAC Level 3 and above was -0.3% less than in 2017. This was smaller than the forecast decrease (-1.7%). However, it was within the margin of error of the forecast.
  • The Fees Free Policy reduced both the number of students borrowing for fees and the amount borrowed for fees in 2018 compared with 2017: the number of students borrowing for fees decreased by 31,600 (-20%) and the amount borrowed for fees decreased by $194.2 million.
  • Fees-free students aged 18-19 years had similar course completion rates to non-fees-free students also aged 18-19 years at Level 5-7 and degree level, and higher course completion rates at Levels 3 and 4.
  • There was an increase in study load of around 9% for fees-free students aged 18-19 years compared with all students aged 18-19 years (in 2018). This represents an increase of around 10 credits of additional study per student, on average.

Background

Since 1 January 2018, fees-free tertiary education and training has been available to students with little or no prior tertiary study. Alongside this, increases to student support (both student allowances and loan entitlements) were implemented.

A monitoring framework has been developed to assess how well the Fees Free Policy objectives are being met across three broad goals:

  • improving access to and affordability of tertiary education and training
  • improving educational outcomes
  • fiscal control and cost effectiveness.

It is recognised that impacts of the Fees Free Policy won’t all happen immediately. Some intended benefits might take several years to be seen, as changes in the cost of tertiary education affect learners’ plans and any extra participation flows through to increased attainment and movements from education to the labour market. However, after the first year of fees-free tertiary education it is possible to assess some of the indicators in the framework, including:

  • demographic trends in participation
  • student debt
  • course completions
  • study load.

We have provided some comparisons of fees-free and non-fees-free students. However, due to the eligibility criteria for fees-free study, the group of students accessing fees-free have specific demographic characteristics which differ from non-fees-free tertiary students. When comparing these two groups of students we need to keep in mind these demographic and study patterns.

Who participated in fees-free study in 2018?

In 2018, there were approximately 47,000 unique fees-free students and trainees. This included 4,845 trainees in industry training benefiting from fees-free study[1].

Approximately 37,140 equivalent full-time students (EFTS) were fees-free in 2018, accounting for around 18% of total EFTS at SAC (Student Achievement Component) Level 3 and above and 17% of EFTS at all levels.

Of the 42,145 fees-free students enrolled in provider-based formal[2] study, 23,535 (56%) were enrolled at universities, 12,110 (29%) at institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs), and 6,960 at private training establishments (PTEs, 16%). Less than one percent of fees-free students were enrolled at wānanga.

By comparison, the distribution of non-fees-free students by sub-sector was: universities (45%), ITPs (35%), PTEs (12%) and wānanga (11%), see Figure 1. The low fees-free enrolments at wānanga may be due to learners being older and having prior tertiary study that makes them ineligible for fees-free study. Also many sub-degree programmes at wānanga did not attract fees prior to the introduction of the fees-free policy.

Figure 1. Distribution of fees-free and non-fees-free students in provider-based study by sub-sector, 2018

Table 1 shows the demographic characteristics of fees-free students in provider-based study.

The gender-distribution of participation in tertiary education was not impacted by the Fees Free Policy. Well over half of fees-free students were women (24,715 students, 59%), compared with 17,430 (41%) men. This is similar to the proportion of women (60%) and men (40%) for non-fees free students.

Most fees-free students were aged 18-19 years (28,980 learners, 69%), 11,760 (28%) were aged 20 years and over and only 1,400 (3%) were aged under 18 years. By comparison, the distribution of non-fees-free students by age group was: over 20 years (93%), aged 18-19 years (6%) and aged under 18 years (1%).

The majority of fees-free students were European (28,605 students, 68%), 7,185 (17%) were Māori, 4,920 (12%) were Pacific peoples and 6,185 (15%) were Asian. By comparison, the distribution of non-fees-free students by ethnicity was: Europeans (63%), Māori (21%), Pacific peoples (9%) and Asian (15%).

Most fees-free students were enrolled in degree-level study (53%) and 44% were enrolled in non-degree-level (Levels 3-7). This compares with 42% of non-fees free students who were enrolled in degree-level study and 45% in non-degree-level study.

Table 1. Characteristics of fees-free and non-fees-free students in provider-based study, 2018

Characteristic

Fees-free students

Non-fees-free students

Number

%

Number

%

Notes:

  1. Data relates to students enrolled at any time during the year with a tertiary education provider in formal qualifications of greater than 0.03 EFTS (more than one week’s full-time duration) at SAC Level 3 and above.
  2. Data in this table, including totals, have been rounded to the nearest 5, so the sum of individual counts may not add to the total.
  3. Students are counted in each qualification level/type they enrol in, so the sum of the various levels may not add to the total.
  4. Students are counted in each ethnic group they identify with, so the sum of the various ethnic groups will not add to the total.
  5. Students are counted in each sub-sector they enrol in, so the sum of the various sub-sectors may not add to the total.
  6. Most postgraduate study is at Level 8, comprising Bachelor with Honours programmes. Around 35 students are in Masters programmes and these are primarily MBAs.
Gender

Females

24,715

59

159,755

60

Males

17,430

41

106,365

40

Total

42,145

100

266,125

100

Age Group

Under 18 years

1,400

3

3,210

1

18-19 years

28,980

69

15,470

6

20 years and over

11,760

28

247,445

93

Total

42,145

100

266,125

100

Ethnic Group

European

28,705

68

166,570

63

Māori

7,220

17

56,745

21

Pacific Peoples

4,925

12

24,440

9

Asian

6,185

15

41,245

15

Other

1,790

4

13,590

5

Total

42,145

100

266,125

100

Qualification Level/Type

Non-degree study (Levels 3-7)

18,415

44

120,710

45

Bachelors degrees

22,320

53

111,075

42

Postgraduate (levels 8-9)

2,665

6

42,900

16

Total

42,145

100

266,125

100

Sub-Sector

Universities

23,535

56

120,155

45

Institutes of technology and polytechnics

12,110

29

92,440

35

Wānanga

255

1

29,050

11

Private training establishments

6,960

16

31,730

12

Total

42,145

100

266,125

100

What happened to participation in tertiary education in 2018?

Enrolments (EFTS) for SAC Level 3 and above decreased by 0.3% from 2017 to 2018 (from 204,030 to 203,380) compared with a forecast decrease of 1.7%. The forecast is based on demographic and labour market data, with no adjustments for policy changes, such as Fees Free. We cannot attribute the smaller decrease than forecast to the Fees Free Policy, or to the increase in student support, as it is within the forecast’s margin of error.

What happened with student loan borrowing in 2018?

The total amount borrowed for student loans decreased by $115.0 million (-7.4%) compared with 2017:

  • fees borrowing was down by $194.2 million;
  • course-related costs borrowing was down by $8.7 million;
  • living costs borrowing increased by $87.9 million (due to the maximum student loan living cost entitlement increasing by $50 a week from 1 January 2018).

The number of students borrowing for fees decreased by 31,600 (-20.0%). Overall borrower numbers reduced by 15,400 (-9.1%).

The reduction in fees borrowing can primarily be attributed to the introduction of the Fees Free Policy, but it will also have been impacted by reductions in enrolments.

Further data on student support (loans and allowances) can be found on the Ministry of Social Development’s StudyLink statistics page here. The Student Loan Scheme Annual Report will be published in late 2019 and will be available here.

Did more students complete their courses in 2018?

A difference in course completion rates[3] was observed at lower levels of study (Level 3 and 4 certificates) for fees-free students compared with non-fees-free students in 2018 (Table 2). To take into account the age concentration of fees-free students, we have compared them to other non-fees-free students that are 18-19 years. However, the eligibility criteria for fees-free means that the 18-19 year olds not eligible for fees-free are likely to have undertaken tertiary study previously, or are enrolled in Youth Guarantee fees-free Level 3 study. They may also be are more likely to have left school prior to 18 years, with lower school qualifications.

Similar patterns in course completion rates were observed for Māori and Pacific students (higher course completion rates for fees-free students compared with non-fees-free students, at lower levels of study).

Table 2: Course completion rates for fees-free and non-fees-free students aged 18-19 years in provider-based study, 2018

Qualification Level

Fees-free students (%)

Non-fees-free students (%)

Level 3 certificates

81

70

Level 4 certificates

77

72

Level 5-7 certificates and diplomas

79

79

Bachelors degrees

84

85

Total

83

78

An alternative way to compare course completion rates is to compare the rates for 18-19 year olds in 2017 and 2018 (Table 3). The only difference between 2017 and 2018 is for study at Level 3 (75% compared with 74%), however it should be noted that Youth Guarantee would be included in this level.

Table 3: Course completion rates for students aged 18-19 years in 2017 and 2018

Qualification Level

2017 (%)

2018 (%)

Level 3 certificates

75

74

Level 4 certificates

76

76

Level 5-7 certificates and diplomas

79

79

Bachelors degrees

85

84

Total

81

81

We would not expect to see a fees-free effect for qualification completions because the majority of students completing their qualifications in 2018 would have started their study in the years prior to the introduction of the policy.

Even for short (less than one year) qualifications at Level 3-4, it is too soon to analyse qualification completion rates. For example, in monitoring tertiary education providers’ education performance indicators, qualification completion rates for Level 1-3 qualifications are assessed two years after the starting year. Part-time study is more common at lower levels of study and therefore some people may take more than one year to complete their qualification.

Were study loads influenced by fees-free study?

Students appear to have taken advantage of the fees-free policy by choosing to take on a higher study load, as there is no in-year EFTS cap for fees-free consumption. Fees-free students are still subject to the $12,000 cap for fees-free payments. Despite this increase in study load, lower course completion rates for fees-free students were not observed

In the five previous years (2013-2017), the average annual study load for all domestic students has been relatively stable at around 0.66 EFTS per student. For students aged 18-19 years the figure has been relatively stable at around 0.86 EFTS per student.

The average annual study load for fees-free students aged 18-19 years was 0.94 EFTS per student. This represents an increase of around 9% or 10 credits of additional study per fees-free student, on average.

However, study load patterns can vary between study levels. For example, for fees-free students aged 18-19 years, studying at degree-level, the average annual study load was 0.97 EFTS per student. This compares with a study load of 0.95 EFTS per student for 18-19 year olds studying at degree-level in 2017. For fees-free students studying at non-degree levels, the average annual study load was 0.79 EFTS per student. This compares with a study load of 0.63 EFTS per student for 18-19 year olds studying at non-degree level in 2017.

Further monitoring

The Fees Free Policy will continue to be monitored against the framework and further information will be published on Education Counts as data becomes available, including data on fees-free industry training and apprenticeships.

Footnotes

  1. We will provide additional information on trainees in industry training when data becomes available later in the year.
  2. Formal study refers to learning that is organised, intentional, institutionalised (but not just provider-based) and nationally recognised. For this report, only provider-based formal study of greater than 0.03 EFTS (more than one week’s full-time duration) is counted.
  3. How does the Ministry of Education calculate tertiary qualification completion rates?