Competent Children, Competent Learners

Publication Details

This is the home page for the Competent Children, Competent Learners publication series.

The Competent Children, Competent Learners project is a longitudinal study undertaken by the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) which focuses on a group of about 500 young people from the greater Wellington region.

Seven phases of the project have now been completed - the first when the students were near age 5, the next when they were at age 6 and then at ages 8, 10, 12,14 and 16. A further phase is currently underway collecting data from the sample of young people at age 20.

Author(s): Various

Date Published: Various

When the project began in 1993 its aim was to provide New Zealand policy makers and the early childhood education sector with a study which could show the concurrent, short-term, and long-term impact of early childhood education experience. As the project continued, the development of students' competence in mathematics, literacy and logical problem solving, and their competence in social and communication skills, has assumed more prominence, particularly in the project's ability to relate these to the home resources and experiences that students have, to trace the impact of different factors over time, and to compare the cumulative impact of differences in home and schools resources and experiences.

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  • Competent Children at 8

    This is the third report from the Competent Children longitudinal study, which is following a sample of Wellington region children as they grow from young children who attended an early childhood education centre, through their school attendance.

    Author(s): Cathy Wylie, Jean Thompson and Cathy Lythe, New Zealand Council for Educational Research.

    Date Published: 1999

  • Competent Children at 6

    This is the second report from the Competent Children longitudinal study, which is following a sample of Wellington region children as they grow from young children who attended an early childhood education centre, through their school attendance.

    Author(s): Cathy Wylie and Jean Thompson, New Zealand Council for Educational Research.

    Date Published: 1998

  • Competent children and their teachers: learning about trajectories and other schemas

    This report outlines an early part of the Competent Children project: an action research study of six months in the lives of 10 children aged between 4 and 5 years. Using recent advances in theory about how children learn to think, researchers worked with the children's parents and early childhood education teachers to help them observe the children and plan ways to enhance their learning.

    Author(s): Anne Meade and Pamela Cubey in association with Anne Hendricks and Cathy Wylie, New Zealand Council for Educational Research and Faculty of Education, Victoria University of Wellington.

    Date Published: 1996

  • Competent Children at 5

    This is the first report from the Competent Children longitudinal study, which is following a sample of Wellington region children as they grow from young children who attended an early childhood education centre, through their school attendance.

    Author(s): Cathy Wylie, Jean Thompson and Anne Kerslake Hendricks, New Zealand Council for Educational Research.

    Date Published: 1996

  • Competent children: Influences of early childhood experiences - Pilot study report

    In January 1992, the Ministry of Education began funding the Competent Children longitudinal study, to look at the effects of early childhood contexts on children. The first-stage funding allowed the research team to undertake a pilot study for the main longitudinal project, and to conduct an action research study of a small number of children to examine the effects of intervening in their curriculum for learning at home and in early childhood settings.

    Author(s): Anne Hendricks and Anne Meade, in conjunction with Cathy Wylie, New Zealand Council for Educational Research and Faculty of Education, Victoria University of Wellington

    Date Published: July 1993

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