Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori: Analysis of Feedback from Readiness Workshops

Publication Details

The Ministry of Education held a series of readiness workshops with the Māori-medium sector about the implementation of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. The purpose of the workshops was to provide key information to school leaders, Boards of Trustees and In-Service Teacher educators to ensure they are well prepared and have a clear understanding of what they are required to do when implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. At the workshops feedback was sought from attendees on their confidence towards implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, any challenges that existed and what further support was required. This report outlines the findings of the feedback from the Readiness Workshops.

Author(s): Kāhui Tautoko Consulting Limited.

Date Published: August 2011

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Executive Summary

From 2011, Māori-medium schools that use Te Marautanga o Aotearoa will implement Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, Māori-medium national standards, for students in years 1 to 8. They describe the pāngarau and te reo skills and knowledge students need to learn at different stages of their schooling. Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori aims to help Māori communities localise the curriculum and together shape Māori-medium education, while also meeting the Government's goals of improved achievement and accountability of schools to parents through plain language reporting.

Over the period March to April 2011, the Ministry of Education (hereafter referred to as 'the Ministry') held a series of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori Readiness Workshops with the Māori-medium sector in 16 regions throughout the country. At these Readiness Workshops feedback was sought from the sector on their confidence towards implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, any challenges that existed and what further support was required.

The Ministry sought feedback from participants through a hard copy survey form handed out and collected at the Readiness Workshops.

Across the 16 regions a total of 348 people attended the Readiness Workshops. Of those who attended, a total of one hundred and ninety eight (198) hard copy survey responses were collected. A total of 51 (25.8%) responses were received either fully or partly in te reo Māori and 147 (74.2%) responses received in English. Reflecting those who attended, the majority of responses (115 or 58.4%) were received from school leaders (teaching staff or senior management). Over a quarter (56 or 28.4%) of the responses were received from Board of Trustees members and 20 (10.2%) responses were received from In-Service Teacher Educators (ISTE) which provides a good range of perspectives.

High level of confidence for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori

Overall the level of confidence in implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori is relatively high. Across the country 62% of respondents were either 'Confident' (54%) or 'Very confident' (8%) with implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Just over 30% of respondents were 'Not very confident' and 8% were 'Not at all confident'.

Of those who were 'Very confident' or 'Confident' they indicated that there was strong support from whānau, staff and kura leadership towards implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. There was clear alignment between Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and there was confidence as a result of receiving valuable professional development and support in understanding Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and how to implement it within Māori-medium settings.

Of those who indicated that they were 'Not very confident' or 'Not at all confident' some stated that there was a lack of professional development opportunities made available to assist staff and kura to effectively implement Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. There was a lack of knowledge or understanding around Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori as some had only just begun to become familiar with them and that more time was needed to be able to gain a clear understanding of the expectations around Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and then be able to effectively implement it.

Challenges with Implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori

While there was a high level of confidence, there were a number of responses highlighting challenges to being able to effectively implement Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Key themes to emerge from the responses included challenges around building the understanding and buy-in from whānau and the community around Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, that more support (including professional development) would need to be made available and prioritised to kura and whānau, and that given the changes and expectations around Te Marautanga o Aotearoa some were struggling with the implementation timeframes for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.


There were also comments relating to Māori language provision within english medium settings. Challenges existed in gaining support for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori from senior leadership, the Boards of Trustees and the wider school community. A small number of responses stated there was a perceived lack of consistency and alignment across the school in implementing different curriculums (New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa) and standards (Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and National Standards) as well as duplication of reporting requirements.

Further Support Required

The most prominent response related to the need for more ongoing professional development around Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Other supports needed included upskilling in te reo Māori proficiency, a longer timeframe for implementation of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori as well as providing additional tools and resources such as best practice guidelines in plain language reporting, templates, exemplars, Frequently Asked Questions, CD-Roms, case studies and online tools.

Responses also suggested other supports that were required including enabling networking opportunities with other kura who are implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori which could be facilitated through workshops, facilitated discussions, cluster groups, peer support, mentoring and inter-kura visits. More support was required from In-Service Teacher Educators and Facilitators as well as strong buy-in and support from whānau, senior leadership and Boards of Trustees.

Other Comments

Overall respondents acknowledged the supportive role that the Readiness Workshop Facilitators had played in developing understanding around Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and indicated strong support and willingness for the implementation of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Many were supportive of the progressions approach as part of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori which was considered suited to Māori-medium settings and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori was seen as a great opportunity to increase achievement for learners, to collaborate more effectively with whānau as well as ensuring an evidence based approach.

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