Literature Review: Innovative Teaching and Learning Practice for Māori-medium Education (2012)

Publication Details

This literature review aims to create an evidence-based foundation for supporting the development of effective and innovative practices that can contribute to quality teaching and learning.

Author(s): Haemata Limited, Report for the Ministry of Education.

Date Published: July 2012

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Summary

Introduction

"The emerging educational vision among Māori is the desire for an education that enhances what it means to be Māori, so simple and yet so profound." (Penetito,2002)1.

  1. This literature review aims to create an evidence-based foundation for supporting the development of effective and innovative practices that can contribute to quality teaching and learning.
  2. Five research questions form the focus of the review:
    1. What is meant by effective, innovative teaching practice in Māori-medium settings2?
    2. What are the critical success factors associated with the development and implementation of effective innovative teaching practice in Māori-medium settings?
    3. How can effective, innovative teaching practice contribute to quality teaching and learning, and valued student outcomes in Māori-medium settings?
    4. What is the relationship between effective, innovative teaching practice and future-focused, transformative educational models for Māori-medium settings?
    5. What can be learned about improving student outcomes from analysis of effective, innovative teaching practice in Māori-medium settings?

Footnotes

  1. Penetito, W. (2002). Research and context for a theory of Māori schooling. In McGill Journal of Education, 37(1).
  2. Māori‐medium education schools and settings include Level 1 immersion environments (where 81–100% of teaching and learning is conducted in Māori) and Level 2 immersion environments (where 51–80% of teaching and learning is conducted in Māori).

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