Publications

Factors linked to young adult literacy

Factors linked to young adult literacy This report explores the factors linked to the literacy of young adults (aged 16-24) in New Zealand using statistical modelling. Literacy here refers to literacy in English only, and the particular aspect of literacy considered is document literacy, which refers to the ability to read and interpret non-continuous texts, such as tables, diagrams and maps. To identify the factors especially important to young people, it compares these with the factors related to document literacy in the population aged 25-65.

Author(s): Chris Lane, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: June 2011

Doing a bachelors degree

Doing a bachelors degree This paper looks at differences in the performance of young people who leave school and progress on to bachelors degree study. It compares the performance of students with different levels of school achievement. It also compares the performance of young degree students at polytechnics and universities. We use qualification completion rates and first-year course completion rates as the measures of performance in tertiary study. We look only at young students studying on a full-time basis, and we take account of the achievement of the students in secondary school.

Author(s): Ralf Engler and Roger Smyth, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: June 2011

School's out - what next?

School's out - what next? This study looked at the destinations of young New Zealanders after they left school. It considered the likelihood of a student choosing a destination from a range of post-secondary school activities—no further study, targeted training, lower-level certificate study, industry training, Modern Apprenticeships, and non-degree study at level 4 or above—diplomas and certificates at level 4.

Author(s): Ralf Engler, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: June 2011

Māori tertiary education students in 2009

Māori tertiary education students in 2009

This is a fact sheet in a series on Māori tertiary education students. There is an associated set of tables available on the Māori Education Statistics page here on Education Counts.

This factsheet includes gender information on Māori tertiary education students, the qualifications students are taking, where they are studying, field of study, student allowances and loans and other important characteristics of Māori students. Also included is information on Māori employees in industry training and Gateway.

Author(s): Mieke Wensvoort, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: May 2011

Category: Māori Medium

e-Learning provision and participation: Trends, patterns and highlights

e-Learning provision and participation: Trends, patterns and highlights This report analyses tertiary sector e-Learning provision at a system, sub-sector and course level from 2004 to 2008. The sub-sectors focused on in the report are universities and polytechnics and the course levels bachelors degrees and certificates (Levels 1-4). Participation in e-Learning course at these levels over the same time period is analysed by focusing on the following learner groups: 18-19 year olds, the 40+ age group, Māori, Pasifika and European and females and males

Author(s): Peter Guiney, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: April 2011

Literacy and numeracy at work

Literacy and numeracy at work

This report looks at the use of literacy and numeracy skills at work, and how this relates to the skills and education of employees. It uses data from the Adult Literacy and Lifeskills (ALL) survey to look at how well employees’ skills match the literacy and numeracy practices that they undertake at work. It looks at how skills and education relate to different sets of practices, such as financial literacy and numeracy. It also identifies which groups of employees are more likely to have a skills shortfall or skills excess, and some of the barriers to further training for those with a skills shortfall.

Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: February 2011

Pasifika tertiary education students by ethnicity: 2009

Pasifika tertiary education students by ethnicity: 2009

This is edition four in an annual series on Pasifika tertiary education students by ethnicity. There is an associated set of tables available on the Pasifika Tertiary Education Statistics on Education Counts.

This fact sheet includes gender information on the ethnicities of New Zealand’s Pasifika tertiary education students. It shows the trends in participation in tertiary study for the various Pasifika ethnicities: what qualifications Pasifika students are taking, where they are studying, their field of study, their ages, and other important characteristics of Pasifika students.

Author(s): Mieke Wensvoort, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: January 2011

Pasifika peoples in tertiary education in New Zealand: 2009

Pasifika peoples in tertiary education in New Zealand: 2009

This is edition four in an annual series on Pasifika tertiary education students. There is an associated set of tables available on the Pasifika Tertiary Education Statistics on Education Counts.

This fact sheet includes gender information on Pasifika tertiary education students, the qualifications students are taking, where they are studying, field of study, student allowances and loans and other important characteristics of Pasifika students. Also included is information on Pasifika employees in industry training and some comparisons with international students from the Pacific.

Author(s): Mieke Wensvoort, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: January 2011

How can tertiary education deliver better value to the economy?

How can tertiary education deliver better value to the economy? This paper asks how tertiary education can deliver better value to the economy. It is based on a presentation given at the New Zealand conference of the Association of Tertiary Education Management in Auckland in July 2010.

Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: December 2010

Outputs and outcomes of the government’s tertiary education expenditure 2005-2009

Outputs and outcomes of the government’s tertiary education expenditure 2005-2009 This report synthesises the inputs, outputs and outcomes of the government’s tertiary education expenditure over the period 2005 to 2009 in eight key funds. In total, these funds distributed around $4.3 billion to providers and students in 2009.

Author(s): Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis & Reporting [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: November 2010

Student Loan Scheme Annual Report 2010

Student Loan Scheme Annual Report 2010

The Annual Report for 2010 provides information on the scheme and those who borrowed from it in 2009, as well as the financial schedules for the fiscal year to 30 June 2010.

This year’s report is structured so that the information aligns with the outcomes framework developed by the agencies that manage and administer the scheme. Key findings in the report are:

  • The nominal value of loan balances was $11.145 billion as at 30 June 2010
  • 199,000 students borrowed from the loan scheme in 2009 (71% of eligible students)
  • As at 30 June 2010 587,500 people had a student loan with Inland Revenue for collection
  • The median repayment time for those who left study in 2006 is forecast to be 6.5 years

Author(s): Ministry of Education

Date Published: October 2010

How does New Zealand's education system compare?
OECD's Education at a Glance 2010

How does New Zealand's education system compare?<br /> OECD's Education at a Glance 2010 Every year, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) publishes Education at a Glance, a set of indicators that compares the education systems of its member countries, and participating partner countries.

The report How does New Zealand's education system compare? draws on the New Zealand data in Education at a Glance 2010 and summarises the characteristics and performance of New Zealand's education system in an international context.

Author(s): David Scott and Paul Gini, Strategy and System Performance, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: September 2010

Analysing the performance of New Zealand universities in the 2010 Academic Ranking of World Universities

Analysing the performance of New Zealand universities in the 2010 Academic Ranking of World Universities This occasional paper examines the performance of New Zealand universities in the 2010 Shanghai Jiao Tong University Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU). In particular, the analysis examines the data behind the overall rankings to get a more comprehensive picture of the level of performance of New Zealand universities.

Author(s): Dr Warren Smart, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: September 2010

Download Full Report: PDF PDF 132 kb Word Word 179 kb

Note: Table 1 and Table 2 in this report have been revised (November 2010).

Industry Training stocks and flows... and the effects of the economic downturn

Industry Training stocks and flows... and the effects of the economic downturn This paper examines the new starts, terminations and other exits in industry training, looking at the relationship between industry training take-up and the business cycle. Because participants in industry training must have jobs to enter training, and because industry shares some of the cost of training, it is expected that flows of learners into, within, and out of industry training will match changes in the business cycle.

Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: September 2010

Digital Information Literacy: Supported Development of Capability in Tertiary Environments

Digital Information Literacy: Supported Development of Capability in Tertiary Environments This report describes a project to explore what digital information literacy is and how it could be most effectively applied in tertiary education. It provides an initial definition of digital information literacy based on a review of the national and international literature. It identifies methods to develop adults’ digital skills and capabilities, and to understand how these contribute to lifelong learning.

Its key findings are that having dedicated time, support and the opportunity to experiment with a range of ICT tools were essential for developing digital information literacy. The research showed that this could be achieved in a relatively short and intensive period of professional development and that this resulted in large changes to participants’ digital information behaviour and skills.

Author(s): Bronwyn Hegarty and Merrolee Penman (Otago Polytechnic), Oriel Kelly (Manukau Institute of Technology), Lynn Jeffrey (Massey University), Dawn Coburn and Jenny McDonald (University of Otago)

Date Published: August 2010

Social and economic indicators of education

Social and economic indicators of education This report uses data from the 2008 New Zealand General Social Survey to explore how a range of 30 social and economic indicators vary with education. It provides evidence supporting known economic benefits, and new evidence on a range of social indicators, including health and safety, voting, volunteering, social cohesion, national identity, tolerance and environmental practices.

Author(s): David Scott, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: August 2010

Education Statistics of New Zealand

Education Statistics of New Zealand This is the home page for the Education Statistics of New Zealand publication series. These publications provide basic information on the education sector.

Basic information is provided for early childhood education, primary and secondary schooling, and tertiary education.  Education Statistics of New Zealand is provided in Booklet format(as PDF downloads) and as Statistical Table format (as MS Excel downloads).

Author(s): Data Management and Analysis Division, Ministry of Education

Date Published: Annually

Profile & Trends 2009: New Zealand's Tertiary Education Sector

Profile & Trends 2009: New Zealand's Tertiary Education Sector

This is edition 12 in an annual series on the tertiary education sector. Key findings from the 2009 report are:

  • 469,000 students were enrolled in formal study programmes in 2009, including 43,500 international students. There were 202,000 industry trainees in 2009.
  • Young tertiary students are studying at a more advanced level. More than three out of four young tertiary students are now studying level 4 qualifications and above.
  • International tertiary student numbers increased by more than 9 percent in 2009. In 2010, international enrolments are expected to increase by about 8 percent, while domestic enrolments are expected to increase slightly.
Short articles on the following topics are included in Profile & Trends 2009: Participation in post-compulsory education following decreases in New Zealand’s economic activity, What do students earn after their tertiary education, Raising the literacy, language and numeracy of the adult population, Progression to, and success in, bachelors-level study, Adults in non-formal and formal learning, and Students who had a disability

Author(s): Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education

Date Published: August 2010

Are particular school subjects associated with better performance at university?

Are particular school subjects associated with better performance at university? This analysis looks at the association of school subject and school achievement on university performance. The school subjects considered are those on the ‘approved list’ of subjects for the New Zealand university entrance requirement.

Author(s): Ralf Engler, Senior Research Analyst, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Report [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: July 2010

Comparing Modern Apprenticeships and industry training

Comparing Modern Apprenticeships and industry training The Modern Apprenticeships programme was introduced nation-wide in 2001 to address participation problems in workplace industry training by young people. It is aimed at 15 to 21 year olds wishing to participate in formalised workplace-based training, and is intended to lead to national qualifications.

Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Senior Research Analyst, Tertiary Sector Performance, Analysis and Reporting [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: July 2010

Search Publications

Contact Us

For more publication-related
information, please email the:
Information Officer Mailbox


Vist the OECD website:
Logo-OECD-Higher-Education-2013

 Copyright © Education Counts 2014   |   Contact information.officer@minedu.govt.nz for enquiries.