Developing Mathematical Inquiry Communities

Introduction

Leaders from Southern Cross Campus Junior School explain Developing mathematical inquiry communities and how it has been applied.

07 TEACHER DEVELOPMENT from BES Programme on Vimeo.

Key Content

It has been a three-year journey, beginning with a radical shift in mindset and the development of new pedagogical knowledge, followed by a year of embedding the changes, and then working to reduce dependence on external expertise by growing internal expertise.

Evidence in Action

The video highlights these aspects of the Southern Cross Campus experience:

  • A shift in mindset has been required of both teachers and students
  • Teachers have had to develop new pedagogical knowledge
  • The focus in the second year is on embedding the pedagogy in classrooms
  • School leadership is now working to reduce dependence on external facilitation
  • Internal staff ownership and pedagogical leadership are keys to ongoing improvement.

Strategies include:

  • Peer observations in each other's classrooms
  • Collaboration that involve open discussion, critique and support
  • Lesson study:
    • A group of teachers plan the lesson
    • One teacher teaches while the rest of the group observes
    • The group critiques each part of the lesson to see how it could be improved
    • Another teacher teaches the lesson, drawing on what has been learned through the group critique.

Key Evidence Informing Action - References

Specialist providers, principals and teachers working in New Zealand schools and early childhood services, as well as the New Zealand Ministry of Education and central government education agency staff, can contact the Ministry of Education Library for access to the key evidence. For anyone else requiring this material, you can contact your institution or local public library.

  1. Alton-Lee, A., Hunter, R., Sinnema, C., & Pulegatoa-Diggins, C. (2012, April). BES Exemplar 1 Ngā Kete Raukura – He Tauira: Developing communities of mathematical inquiry. Wellington: Ministry of Education.
  2. Anthony, G., Hunter, J., & Hunter, R. (2015a). Learning to professionally notice students' mathematical thinking through rehearsal activities. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, 17(2), 7-24.
  3. Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2010). Te ako pāngarau whaihua: Educational practices series – 19. International Academy of Education, International Bureau of Education & UNESCO.
  4. Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2009). Effective pedagogy in mathematics: Educational practices series –19. International Academy of Education, International Bureau of Education & UNESCO.
  5. Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2007). Effective pedagogy in mathematics/pāngarau: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.
  6. Cordingley, P., Higgins, S., Greany, T., Buckler, N., Coles-Jordan, D., Crisp, B., Saunders, & L., Coe, R. (2015). Developing great teaching: Lessons from the international reviews into effective professional development. United Kingdom: Teacher Development Trust.
  7. Hunter, J. (2014). Developing early algebraic reasoning in a mathematical community of inquiry. Doctoral Thesis, Plymouth University, UK.
  8. Hunter, J., & Back, J. (2011). Facilitating sustainable professional learning through lesson study. Mathematics Teacher Education and Development. 13 (1), 94-114.
  9. Robinson, V., Hohepa, M., & Lloyd C. (2009). School leadership and student outcomes: Identifying what works and why: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.
  10. Timperley, H. (2009). Te kaupapa whakaako, Whakapakari kaiako: Te kete tikanga matauranga 18. International Academy of Education, International Bureau of Education & UNESCO.
  11. Timperley, H. (2008). Teacher professional learning and development: Educational practices series-18. International Academy of Education, International Bureau of Education & UNESCO.
  12. Timperley, H., Wilson, A., Barrar, H., & Fung. I. (2007). Teacher professional learning and development: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.

Videos (14)

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