Kōrero: primary schooling

What We Have Found

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori Kōrero results show that 59.8% of students achieved at either manawa ora or manawa toa for kōrero in 2016.

Date Updated: August 2017

Indicator Description

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori Kōrero results.

Why This Data is Important

In the context of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, kōrero relates to oral communication or speaking. Oral communication is an important part of Māori culture and, more generally, an important part of conversing and connecting with others regardless of culture. Kōrero is especially important to Māori because up until the 19th century Māori was not a written language and speaking was the primary means of sharing information, or stories, and passing knowledge down through generations. Speaking in person also conveys the emotional or spiritual aspects of a message more strongly.

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori: Kōrero

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori are the Māori medium equivalent of National Standards and are used to support teachers who use Te Marautanga o Aotearoa to inform their teaching and to monitor the achievement levels of Year 1 to 8 students.

The 2016 year was the fifth year for which kura and schools using Te Marautanga o Aotearoa reported their results for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Due to a large difference in the sample of schools that supplied data over the last five years and an update in assessments, only data from 2014 onwards are included in this indicator.

Ngā Whanaketanga kōrero (speaking) students can be assessed as:

Manawa Toa
Kei runga noa atu. The student is progressing and achieving higher than expected for particular learning areas.

Manawa Ora
Kua tutuki Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. The student is progressing and achieving as expected for particular learning areas.

Manawa Āki
E whanake tonu ana kia tutuki Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. The student is progressing but requires further support to assist their achievement for particular learning areas.

Manawa Taki
Me āta tautoko kia tutuki Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. The student requires in-depth support to assist their achievement for particular learning areas.

Of the 202 schools and kura with Year 1-8 students that taught using Te Marautanga o Aotearoa in 2016, 131 provided Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori data. Of these, 126 kura and schools provided data about students assessed for kōrero in 2016.

How We Are Going

In 2016, 59.8% of students assessed for kōrero were assessed to be either manawa ora or manawa toa. This is a 3.2 percentage point decrease from 2015 (63.0%).

When split into all achievement categories, 13.7% were assessed to be manawa taki, 26.6% assessed to be manawa āki, 42.3% assessed to be manawa ora and 17.4% assessed to be manawa toa in kōrero.

Figure 1: Proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa in Ngā Whanaketanga for kōrero (speaking) (2014-2016)

Ethnic Group

Over 99% of students that are assessed under Ngā Whanaketanga are Māori. There are only a very small absolute number of non-Māori students assessed using Ngā Whanaketanga. For this reason ethnic groups have not been separated out for comparison.

Gender

Kōtiro (girls) were more likely to be assessed as achieving either manawa ora or manawa toa than tama (boys) for kōrero (64.9% compared with 54.5%; a difference of 10.4 percentage points). Both kōtiro and tama have had a decrease in achievement since 2015 (See Figure 2).

Figure 2: Proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa in Ngā Whanaketanga for kōrero,
by gender (2014-2016)

Quintile

Decile provides a measure of the socio-economic status of a school's student body: the lower a kura or school's decile is, the lower their school community's socio-economic status is. Due to the small number of schools (and therefore students) that are assessed using Ngā Whanaketanga, there are some deciles that have no students being assessed. To provide a better indication of socio-economic spread of achievement in kōrero, deciles have been grouped into quintiles, with quintiles 4 and 5 grouped together. There were 88 kura or schools in quintile 1 (deciles 1 and 2), 25 in quintile 2 (deciles 3 and 4), 7 in quintile 3 (deciles 5 and 6) and 7 in quintiles 4 and 5 (deciles 7 to 10).

When grouped in this way, the proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa appear to have little variation with quintile. The difference between quintile 1 (59.4%) and quintiles 4 and 5 (63.3%) is only 3.9 percentage points. Since 2015, kura across all deciles have seen a decrease in achievement (See Figure 3).

Figure 3: Proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa in Ngā Whanaketanga for kōrero,
by quintile (2015-2016)

Whanaketanga Level

Rather than examining Ngā Whanaketanga results by year level, Ngā Whanaketanga is split up into Whanaketanga levels, much as deciles are grouped into quintiles. Whanaketanga 1 includes Year 1 and 2 students, Whanaketanga 2 includes Year 3 and 4 students, Whanaketanga 3 includes Year 5 and 6, and Whanaketanga 4 includes Year 7+.

Drawing conclusions about the achievement of students in one Whanaketanga level compared to another within the same year is not advisable because of how assessment standards may differ from Whanaketanga level to Whanaketanga level. Comparisons within Whanaketanga levels, across time, do not carry the same issues.

Between 2014 and 2015 all Whanaketanga levels have shown a decrease in the proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa. Decrease in achievement ranged from 3.2 percentage points in Whanaketanga levels 4 and 5 to 3.7 percentage points in Whanaketanga level 1 (See Figure 4).

Figure 4: Proportion of students achieving manawa ora or manawa toa in Ngā Whanaketanga for kōrero,
by Whanaketanga level (2015-2016)

References

  • Ministry of Education (2008). Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. Wellington: Ministry of Education
  • Ministry of Education. (2014). Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. Retrieved from the Te Kete Ipurangi website.
  • Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori. (2014). Reo Kōrero – Spoken Māori. Retrieved from the  Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori website.
  • Te Ara The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. (2014). Story: Whakapapa – genealogy. Retrieved from  Te Ara The Encyclopedia of New Zealand website.

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