Outcomes

Graduates’ earnings, labour market outcomes, economic growth, qualifications held by the population and incomes.

  • Moving on up: What young people earn after their tertiary education

    This report forms part of a series called Beyond Tertiary Study. It looks at the outcomes for young people who complete a qualification in the New Zealand tertiary education system. It looks at differences in incomes and employment rates for different types of qualifications. So the information in this report can help young people as they make decisions about what to study.

    Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Zaneta Park and Roger Smyth, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: January 2013

  • Employment outcomes for ECE teaching graduates

    This report looks at the post-study employment and earnings for ECE teaching graduates over a five year period following the completion of their qualification. The research provides information on the make-up of ECE teaching graduates, and aims to provide insights on how attractive the ECE sector may be in terms of recruiting, retaining and renumerating ECE teaching graduates.

    Author(s): Temaleti Tupou and David Scott, ECE Analysis, Education Information and Analysis, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: March 2012

  • Going abroad: What do we know about people going overseas after tertiary study?

    This report looks at people who used the Student Loan Scheme while undertaking tertiary study, and then went overseas. It profiles those overseas and looks at the characteristics of those who return to New Zealand and of those who stay away

    The analysis finds that at any point in time, a high proportion of borrowers will be overseas-based. Of those who were found to have returned, most did so after a reasonably short period – three years or less. But a large proportion had been away for longer than three years and was still based overseas at the end of our data series.

    While those overseas have poor student loan repayment records overall, those who return make good progress in repaying loans. Those who return repay at a slightly faster rate than those who never went overseas, in part because they are more likely to have higher qualifications that lead to higher earnings.

    Author(s): Roger Smyth, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis, Ministry of Education and Deborah Spackman, Statistics New Zealand.

    Date Published: January 2012

  • Do people with doctoral degrees get jobs in NZ post study?

    This study uses an integrated dataset maintained by Statistics New Zealand to analyse what percentage of a cohort of recent domestic doctoral graduates was employed in New Zealand and their industry destination up to four years post study.

    Author(s): Dr Warren Smart, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: September 2011

  • What do men and women earn after their tertiary education?

    This paper looks at the relationship between young peoples’ tertiary education qualifications and their employment and earnings once they finish their tertiary study. It has a particular focus on differences in the post-study earnings between males and females, using the Employment Outcomes of Tertiary Education (EOTE) dataset.

    Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: September 2011

  • Labour market returns to further education for working adults

    The Department of Labour (DoL) has released a report that investigates the effects of non-degree, provider-based tertiary education on the earnings of older learners. This study uses the Employment Outcomes of Tertiary Education dataset, held by Statistics New Zealand which contains information derived from tax and benefit data collections and the education system.

    Author(s): Sarah Crichton and Sylvia Dixon, Department of Labour

    Date Published: June 2011

  • Achievement in formal tertiary education

    • Achievement at public tertiary education institutions has improved for both full-time and part-time students.
    • Achievement at private training establishments has improved for full-time students, while it declined slightly for part-time students.

    This analyses looks at whether rates of achievement have been improving and whether there are differences in achievement for men and women, or between ethnic groups. It looks at 10 cohorts of domestic tertiary education students. The first cohort of students started study in 1996 and the last cohort of students started study in 2005. For each cohort, the rate of qualification completion was calculated five years after starting study.

    Author(s): Mieke Wensvoort, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: June 2011

  • How can tertiary education deliver better value to the economy?

    This paper asks how tertiary education can deliver better value to the economy. It is based on a presentation given at the New Zealand conference of the Association of Tertiary Education Management in Auckland in July 2010.

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

    Date Published: December 2010

  • Social and Economic Indicators of Education

    This report uses data from the 2008 New Zealand General Social Survey to explore how a range of 30 social and economic indicators vary with education. It provides evidence supporting known economic benefits, and new evidence on a range of social indicators, including health and safety, voting, volunteering, social cohesion, national identity, tolerance and environmental practices.

    Author(s): David Scott, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: August 2010

  • Academic performance of first-year bachelors students at university

    The study considered a population of first-year bachelors-degree students at university, who had all achieved the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) level 3 and attained the University Entrance standard.

    Author(s): Ralf Engler, Senior Research Analyst, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Report, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: May 2010

  • Benefits of tertiary certificates and diplomas: Exploring economic and social outcomes

    This report examines the economic and social benefits of tertiary certificates and diplomas and provides new evidence of the value of a significant part of the tertiary education system. It makes use of a range of data to look at the association of tertiary certificates and diplomas to economic outcomes (employment and income) and social outcomes (well-being, social participation and intergenerational benefits).

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: May 2010

  • Skills, qualifications, experience and the distribution of wages

    This paper extends previous work on skills, qualifications and wages to look at the relationship between literacy skills and qualifications to the distribution of wages. It draws on data from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills (ALL) Survey. It shows that people with higher levels of literacy have significantly greater opportunities to earn higher incomes, where they are earning above the median wage.

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: March 2010

  • Labour market outcomes of skills and qualifications

    This paper looks at the employment and income benefits of literacy skills and qualifications.It draws on data from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills (ALL) survey. The results of the analysis show that the benefit of increased literacy without higher qualifications is limited in the New Zealand labour market. The major benefit comes from improved literacy in combination with gaining a qualification, which can result in greater opportunities to move into higher paid jobs.

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: March 2010

  • Training Opportunities: Exploring what happens two months later

    This paper builds on previous statistical analysis published by the Ministry of Education on Training Opportunities, a programme designed to help people get into the labour force through providing training and foundation skills.

    Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: February 2010

  • Tertiary education, skills and productivity

    This report updates and extends an article that was first published in Profile and Trends 2007 (Ministry of Education, 2008). It provides an overview of the information and literature relating to the link between tertiary education, skills and productivity in New Zealand.

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: February 2010

  • What do students earn after their tertiary education?

    This report forms one of the initial outputs from a project between the Ministry of Education, the Department of Labour and Statistics New Zealand looking at the employment outcomes of tertiary education (EOTE).

    Information about the EOTE project, the data it uses, and other publications from this project can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website.

    This report looks at the group of nearly 30,000 young domestic students who last enrolled in a tertiary education provider in 2003, and examines the influence of their tertiary education on their earnings in the first year following study and three years post-study.

    Author(s): David Scott, Ministry of Education and Statistics New Zealand

    Date Published: September 2009

    Released on Education Counts: 30 September 2009

  • Does workplace based industry training improve earnings?

    This report forms one of the initial outputs from a project between the Ministry of Education, the Department of Labour and Statistics New Zealand looking at the employment outcomes of tertiary education (EOTE). It examines the labour market outcomes of employees who left industry training during 2003–05, by comparing earnings and employment post training with earnings and employment prior to and during training.

    Author(s): Sarah Crichton, Department of Labour and Statistics New Zealand

    Date Published: September 2009

    Released on Education Counts: 30 September 2009

  • Training Opportunities: Statistical Profile 1999 to 2007

    This paper provides participation and labour market outcome analysis of the Training Opportunities programme between 1999 and 2007, using the Training Opportunities administrative dataset. This is the first time this information has been made available in a single analysis.

    Author(s): Paul Mahoney, Senior Research Analyst, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting Division [Ministry of Education]

    Date Published: September 2009

    Released on Education Counts: 24 September 2009

  • Advanced trade, technical and professional qualifications: trends in supply

    This is report is the last in a series of three reports looking at the supply of and demand for advanced trade, technical and professional qualifications. See the "Where to Find Out More" inset box for links to the first two reports in the series.

    Author(s): David Earle, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting team

    Date Published: June 2009

  • A closer look at completion in higher education in New Zealand

    New Zealand has one of the lowest reported higher education qualification completion rates in the OECD, significantly below Australia. Why do so many New Zealand students not complete their qualification? This paper looks behind some of the numbers in an attempt to better understand and assess New Zealand's performance compared with Australia and internationally. It looks, for example, at the impact of part-time and partial qualification study on completion rates. New Zealand has the highest reported level of part-time study in the OECD, and one in eight bachelor’s-degree students in New Zealand pass every subject they've enrolled in, yet have not completed their degree after five years. What does this tell us about intentions and about how we should gauge success?

    The paper takes another look at some international comparisons focussing on full-time students, and also looks at the impact of transfers, changing qualifications, and what happens to rates when a ten-year window is taken instead of a five-year window.

    Author(s): David Scott, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis & Reporting, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: May 2009

1 2 3