Fact Sheet: Participation and Attainment of Te Reo Māori in NCEA

Publication Details

This report is the first in a series looking at participation and attainment in individual subjects by senior secondary students involved in NCEA study.

Author(s): Claire Harkess, Michael Parkin and Jill Corrin, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: May 2008

Please consider the environment before printing the contents of this report.

This fact sheet is available as a download (please refer to the 'Downloads' inset box).  Please consider the environment before printing.

Summary

After the summary of key findings from the analysis, some definitions are provided. This report then covers participation and attainment in Te Reo Māori both over 2004-2006, and in more depth for 2006. Reo Māori as a Scholarship subject follows. Te Reo Māori includes both standards from Reo Māori and from Reo Rangatira. Some more depth on Reo Rangatira is provided in the final section.

Key Findings

  • Up to 5% of candidates participate in Te Reo Māori from any one year level. Participation rates have remained stable over the last three years.
  • Participants were more likely to attain Te Reo Māori in 2006 than in 2004.
  • Māori candidates are much more likely to participate in Te Reo than candidates from other ethnic groups.
  • A quarter of the Māori Year 11 participants who attained Te Reo did so at level 2 or above (i.e. at a higher than typical level).
  • Very few participants attain Te Reo at a lower than typical level.
  • Twenty percent of Year 12 participants gained at least 14 credits with merit and/or with excellence.
  • Few Year 9 and Year 10 candidates participate in NCEA Te Reo study. Those who do demonstrate a relatively high attainment rate.
  • Ten percent of participants in Reo Māori scholarship achieved a scholarship.

Definitions

Participation in a subject is defined as gaining at least one credit in the subject. (Data about who enrolled in a subject is not available. Data on achievement of students is available. Therefore participation is estimated via achievement data). Attainment is defined as gaining 14 credits or more at a typical level or higher in the subject. 14 credits is based upon the number of credits per subject from the University Entrance requirements.  The typical level of study for Year 11 students is level 1, for Year 12 it is level 2, and for Year 13 it is level 3.

Analysis is limited to students taking NCEA study. Therefore a denominator of candidates is used. A candidate is a student who has gained at least one NCEA credit in the year.

Note that there are different ways of defining a 'subject' using the National Qualifications Framework data. Analysis from other sources may use different definitions than those used here.

Participation and Attainment 2004-2006

Overall, the proportion of candidates participating in Te Reo Māori has remained steady over the period 2004 – 2006. Participation by Year 11 candidates is the highest, at 5%.

Figure 1: Proportion of candidates to participate in Te Reo Māori by year level, 2004-2006

A graph visually depicting the Proportion of candidates to participate in Te Reo Māori by year level, 2004 - 2006.

Although participation has remained steady, those gaining 14 credits or more at a typical level or higher has increased steadily over 2004 to 2006.

Figure 2: Participants who gained 14 credits or more at a typical level or higher in Te Reo Māori, by year level, 2004-2006

A graph visually depicting the Participants who gained 14 credits or more at a typical level or higher in Te Reo Māori, by year level, 2004 - 2006.

Attainment by Year 11 participants has increased from 51% in 2004 to 56% in 2006. The rate of increase for Year 12 and Year 13 participants is higher than that for Year 11 participants.  Forty-five percent of Year 12 participants attained Te Reo Māori in 2004, compared with 57% in 2006. Thirty-seven percent of Year 13 participants attained Te Reo Māori in 2004, 52% in 2006.

Participation and Attainment by gender and ethnicity, 2006

Unsurprisingly, the majority of candidates to participate in Te Reo Māori are Māori, for example 86% of the Year 11 participants were Māori in 2006. Slightly more females than males participated.

In 2006, 22% of Year 11 Māori candidates, 17% of Year 12 Māori candidates and 14% of Year 13 Māori candidates participated in Te Reo Māori.  2,388 Year 11 Māori candidates participated in 2006, compared with 403 non-Māori.

Figure 3: Proportion of Year 11 candidates to participate in Te Reo Māori, by gender and ethnicity, 2006

A graph visually depicting the Proportion of Year 11 candidates to participate in Te Reo Māori, by gender and ethnicity, 2006.

In 2006, 57% of Year 11 Māori participants attained 14 credits or more at a typical level or higher in Te Reo Māori. Similarly 57% of Year 12 Māori participants and 52% of Year 13 Māori participants also attained Te Reo Māori in 2006. Attainment rates of European/Pakeha participants were similar to that of Māori participants while the attainment rates for Pasifika participants was around 10 percentage points lower. In 2006, female participants were more likely than male participants to attain Te Reo Māori in Years 11 and 12. Male participants were more likely to attain Te Reo Māori in Year 13.

Higher than typical level

The analysis above looked at those candidates who were studying at a typical level or higher. This section looks at a sub-section of this group – those who studied at a higher than typical level.  For Year 11 candidates, a higher than typical level is defined as levels 2 and 3. For Year 12 candidates, higher than typical is defined as level 3.

A relatively large proportion of Year 11 Te Reo Māori participants attained 14 credits or more at levels 2 and/or 3. In particular 14% of Year 11 Māori participants attained Te Reo Māori at this level in 2006 – a quarter of all Year 11 Māori participants to attain at a typical level or higher. For Year 12 Māori participants, 13% attained Te Reo Māori at a higher than typical level in 2006 – again a quarter of all Year 12 Māori participants.   Females are slightly more likely to attain at a higher than typical level than males, generally by 1 or 2 percentage points. Few non-Māori participants attain Te Reo Māori at a higher than typical level.

Figure 4: Proportion of participants to gain 14 credits more at a higher than typical level in Te Reo Māori, by gender and Māori 2006*

A graph visual depicting the Proportion of participants to gain 14 credits more at a higher than typical level in Te Reo Māori, by gender and Māori, 2006.

Note:

  1. *Male and female categories include Māori and non-Māori participants.

Lower Than Typical Level

The analysis above looked at those candidates who were studying at a typical level or higher and a sub-group of those candidates. This section looks at a different group – those who studied at a lower than typical level.  For Year 12 candidates, a lower than typical level is defined as level 1. For Year 13 candidates, lower than typical is defined as levels 1 and 2.

Few participants attained Te Reo Māori at a lower than typical level. In 2006, 63 Year 12 participants did so, as did 50 Year 13 participants. These counts are a decrease from those of 2004 (87 Year 12 and 56 Year 13) and 2005 (68 Year 12 and 58 Year 13).

Table 1: Proportion of 2006 participants to attain Te Reo Maori, by level attained in and Year level, 2006
Note:
  1. Individual groups may not add exactly to total due to rounding
Level Attained Year 11 Year 12 Year 13
Higher than typical level 12% 12% -
Typical level 44% 45% 52%
Lower than typical level - 5% 8%
Total Attainment 56% 61% 59%


Year 12 male participants were more likely to gain 14 credits or more at a lower than typical level in Te Reo Māori, as were Year 12 Pasifika participants.

Altogether an additional 5% of Year 12 participants attained Te Reo Māori at a lower than typical level. Therefore a total 61% of Year 12 participants attained Te Reo Māori at any level in 2006. Similarly an additional 8% of Year 13 participants attained Te Reo Māori at a lower than typical level.

Standards with merit and/or excellence

Achievement standards can be gained with merit or with excellence.  Forty-eight percent of Year 11 participants gained at least one achievement standard with merit or with excellence in 2006. Similarly, 44% of Year 12 participants and 38% of Year 13 participants also gained at least one standard with merit or achievement.

Proportion of participants to gain at least Te Reo one standard with merit and/or with excellence, by year level, 2004-2006

A graph visually depicting the Proportion of participants to gain at least Te Reo one standard with merit and/or with excellence, by year level, 2004-2006.

A smaller number of participants attained at least 14 credits from standards gained with merit or with excellence. Eighteen percent of Year 11 participants did so, as did 20% of Year 12 participants and 14% of Year 13 participants. Generally Māori participants were more likely to gain at least 14 credits with merit or with excellence  than European/Pakeha participants.

Participation and attainment by Year 9 and Year 10 candidates

Level 1 is the typical level of attainment for Year 11 students. However students can choose to participate in NCEA study in Years 9 and 10.  Four hundred and forty-eight Year 9 candidates and 630 Year 10 candidates participated in Te Reo in 2006.

Attainment rates for these candidates were relatively high with 68% of each group attaining at least 14 credits in Te Reo in 2006. Māori students are most likely to participate in NCEA Te Reo study while in Years 9 and/or 10.

Read or answered in Te Reo

Standards can be read in Te Reo and/or answered in Te Reo.

Generally few students take the opportunity to do so. For example, in 2006, 66 candidates read at least one standard in Te Reo - an increase from 49 candidates in 2004. Even less Year 12 and Year 13 did the same though numbers for each year level have increased since 2004.

However in 2006, 268 Year 11 candidates answered at least one standard in Te Reo. This represents nearly a 300% increase from the 2005 count. Numbers of Year 12 and Year 13 candidates to answer standards in Te Reo also rose in 2006 but not to nearly as marked a degree as for Year 11 candidates.

Scholarship

A new form of scholarship has been available from 2005 which replaces previous Scholarship qualifications and awards. Scholarship is a monetary award which recognises top students.

Two to three percent of Year 13 candidates have participated in Reo Māori scholarship over the last two years. Ten percent of participants attain Scholarship awards.

Table 2: Participation in and attainment of Te Reo Māori Scholarship awards, 2005-2006
Year Participation- n Participation - % Attainment - n Attainment - %
2005 170 3 17 10
2006 156 2 16 10

Te Reo Rangatira

Te Reo Rangatira is regarded as a separate subject to Te Reo Māori. Unfortunately, due to data constraints it is not possible to clearly untangle the two as separate subjects so the analysis above has incorporated standards achieved in both Te Reo Rangatira and Te Reo Māori.

According to the July roll returns, most students of Te Reo take Te Reo Māori:

Table 3: Students learning languages at composite and secondary schools by language and learning zone1as at 1 July 2006
Note:
  1. Each subject has a level of study (learning zone) associated with it to indicate the class level at which it is generally studied. The learning zone may differ from the student's year of schooling (e.g. a year 13 student studying science at NCEA Level 1 is recorded in the year 11 learning zone).
Language Zone Year 11 Zone Year 12 Zone Year 13
Te Reo Māori 3,461 1,794 855
Te Reo Rangatira 277 17- 147


However, according to 2006 NCEA data, 651 students participated in Te Reo Māori at level 3 (the equivalent of Zone Year 13) while 456 students participated in Te Reo Rangatira at level 3. Some participated in both.  Of those to participate in Te Reo Rangatira, few gained 14 credits or more solely in Te Reo Rangatira standards. The patterns are the same for level 1 (zone year 11) and level 2 (zone year 12). These findings point to Te Reo Rangatira standards commonly being taught as part of another subject, most likely a Te Reo Māori course.

Where to find out more

Contact Us

Education Data Requests
If you have any questions about education data then please contact us at:
Email:      Requests EDK
Phone:    +64 4 463 8065