Fact Sheet: Māori Student Achievement on the National Qualifications Framework 2002-2005

Publication Details

This fact sheet provides an overview of Māori student achievement between 2002 & 2005. It uses NZQA achievement data at senior secondary school level.

Author(s): Haobo Wang, Claire Harkess and Michael Parkin, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: November 2006

Please consider the environment before printing the contents of this report.

This fact sheet is available as a download (please refer to the 'Downloads' inset box).  Please consider the environment before printing.

Summary

Introduction

This fact sheet provides some key statistics on Māori secondary school student achievement on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) during the time period of 2002 to 2005. Except for participation, all data are based on candidates.

Participation

Year 13 Māori students had a similar participation rate to their non-Māori peers in the last two years. Year 12 Māori students increased their participation between 2004 and 2005 so that in 2005 they also had a similar participation level to their non-Māori peers. However, Year 11 Māori remained less likely to participate in NQF and their level of participation was the same in 2004 and 2005 (Table 1).

Table 1: Participation in NQF Study 2004-2005
Ethnicity 2004 2005
Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13
Māori
83%
83%
90%
83%
87%
89%
Non-Māori
89%
88%
92%
91%
89%
91%

Qualifications gained

  • Overall, Māori candidates were less likely to gain typical level NCEA qualifications than their non-Māori peers. For all candidates, females continue to be more likely to gain a qualification than males and both males and females show very similar trends over time (see Figs. 1 – 3).
  • The proportion of Year 11 Māori candidates to gain at least NCEA level 1 in 2003 (41%) was higher than that in 2002 (36%). Since then, the proportion has remained relatively stable (Fig. 1).
  • It is a concern that the proportion of Year 11 Māori candidates who did not attain any qualifications has remained about 60% in the last three years (2003 – 2005). In contrast, the figure has been 35% or lower for their non-Māori counterparts.
Figure 1: Year 11 Māori and non-Māori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 1 or higher
Image of Figure 1 - Year 11 Maori and non-Maori candidates to gain an NCEA at Level 1 or higher.

Like their non-Māori peers, Year 12 Māori candidates have shown improvement in gaining an NCEA at level 2 or above since 2003 – the proportion was 46% for Māori candidates in 2005, compared to 41% in 2003 (Fig. 2).

Figure 2: Year 12 Māori and non-Māori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 2 or higher
Image of Figure 2 - Year 12 Maori and non-Maori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 2 or higher.
  • The proportion of Year 13 Māori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 3 was 30% in 2005, an increase since 2004 (27%) (Fig. 3).
  • Year 13 candidates were less likely to gain a typical level qualification than those of Year 11 or 12.
Figure 3: Year 13 Māori and non-Māori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 3
Image of Figure 3 - Year 13 Maori and non-Maori candidates to gain an NCEA at level 3.

Attainment of the University Entrance (UE) requirements for Year 13 Māori candidates is slightly higher in 2005 (27%) than in 2004 (25%). The figures were 54% and 52% for non-Māori in 2005 and 2004, respectively.

Credits gained

Overall, Māori candidates were less likely to gain enough credits for a typical NCEA qualification in one year than their non-Māori counterparts. In addition, Māori candidates were also less likely than their non-Māori peers to gain a much higher number of credits in a year than that required for a qualification (over 120 credits in Year 11 for example).

  • For those Year 11 Māori candidates who did not gain enough credits for an NCEA at level 1, more of them were over halfway to the qualification.
  • Moreover, the proportion of Year 11 Māori candidates gaining 120 or more credits has slightly increased since 2002, despite remaining lower than that for non-Māori (Fig. 4).
Figure 4: Year 11 Māori and non-Māori candidates by number of credits gained, 2002 - 2005
Image of Figure 4 - Year 11 Maori and non-Maori candidates by number of credits gained, 2002 - 2005.
  • The proportion of Year 12 Māori candidates gaining a high number of credits has increased annually by 2 - 3 percentage points, with 20% being in this category in 2005.
  • Of those Year 12 Māori candidates who did not gain enough credits for an NCEA level 2, about half were at least halfway towards the qualification.
  • More Year 13 Māori candidates gained a high number of credits 1 in 2005 (10%) compared to in 2004 (8%).
  • Although some Year 13 Māori candidates did not gain any credits at the typical level, the proportion is lower in 2005 (17%) than that (20%) in 2004.

Literacy and Numeracy

  • The proportion of Year 11 Māori candidates meeting both the literacy and numeracy requirements has increased since 2002. The largest increase was between 2002 and 2003 (from 52% to 58%). Since then the increases have been smaller (Fig. 5). A similar trend is also seen for their non-Māori peers.
  • 21% of Year 11 Māori candidates did not meet either of the literacy and numeracy requirements in 2002. The proportion dropped to 15% in 2003 but has remained relatively stable since then. Of the two requirements, more candidates met the numeracy requirement than the literacy requirement.
Figure 5: Year 11 Māori and non-Māori candidates to meet NCEA level 1 literacy and numeracy requirements, 2002-2005
Image of Figure 5 - Year 11 Maori and non-Maori candidates to meet NCEA level 1 literacy and numeracy requirements, 2002 - 2005.

For both Māori and non-Māori candidates, females continue to be more likely to meet the literacy and numeracy requirements than males.

Footnotes

  1. NQF includes NCEA and non-NCEA qualifications. The typical NCEA levels are Level 1 for Year 11 students, Level 2 for Year 12 and Level 3 for Year 13.
  2. A candidate is a student who has gained at least one credit on the NQF.
  3. To gain NCEA level 1, a candidate needs to gain 80 credits and meets the literacy and numeracy requirements.
  4. In this case, a high number of credits refer to 90 credits or more at the typical level or higher.
  5. To gain NCEA level 2, a candidate needs to gain 60 credits at level 2 or above.

Contact Us

For more information about the content on this webpage, please email the:  Tertiary Mailbox