Education that fits: Review of international trends in the education of students with special educational needs

Publication Details

The purpose of this review is to outline international trends in the education of students with special educational needs, with the aim of informing the Ministry of Education’s current review of special education.

Author(s): David Mitchell, PhD - College of Education, University of Canterbury, for the Ministry of Education

Date Published: July 2010

References

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