PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) 2012

Publication Details

In this administration of PISA, over half a million 15-year-olds from 65 countries or economies took part, including all of the OECD member countries.

Author(s): Various

Date Published: Various

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  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume I: Student confidence and beliefs about their ability to learn maths

    This report focuses on the link between self-beliefs and maths achievement. It presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Average levels of learning beliefs among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average
    • Impact of learning beliefs on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in learning beliefs by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the learning beliefs of New Zealand students

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume II: How students approach learning

    This report focuses on the links between maths anxiety, openness to problem solving, perseverance and maths achievement. It presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Maths anxiety, openness to problem solving and perseverance among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of anxiety, openness to problem solving, and perseverance on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in anxiety, openness to problem solving, and perseverance evidence by gender, socio-economic background, and ethnicity.
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the learning approaches of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume III: Why students are motivated to learn maths

    This report focuses on the link between motivation to learn maths and maths achievement. Volume III presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Motivation to learn maths among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of motivation to learn maths on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in motivation to learn maths evident by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the motivation of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • PISA 2012: Series on Learners Volume IV: What students think about school

    This report focuses on the link between attitudes towards school and maths achievement. Volume IV presents data which addresses the following areas:

    • Attitudes towards school among New Zealand students compared with the OECD average.
    • Impact of attitudes towards school on maths achievement in New Zealand.
    • Differences in attitudes towards school evident by gender, socio-economic background, and ethnicity.
    • Changes between 2003 and 2012 in the attitudes of New Zealand students.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Comparative Education Research, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2016

  • Insights for Teachers: New Zealand student self-belief and confidence, and implications for achievement

    Findings and implications from PISA for teaching and learning mathematics.

    Author(s): Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: May 2015

  • PISA 2012: Series on the Learning Environment Volume I: Opportunities to learn maths

    In this report factors relating to opportunities students have to learn different mathematical concepts are brought together to provide a picture of the learning environment and how it relates to maths achievement in the PISA 2012 assessment. First of all, student contact with maths is examined through factors such as time spent learning maths, and whether additional maths classes and extra-curricular maths activities are offered at school. Next, student self-reports of familiarity with 13 mathematical content areas are presented. Finally, information is provided of the relative opportunities that New Zealand students have to learn formal maths problems.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2014

  • PISA 2012: Series on the Learning Environment Volume II: Delivery of Maths

    In this report, how mathematical content is delivered in classrooms is examined. First, some information on maths teaching staff is presented, including teacher qualifications, participation in professional development with a focus on maths, maths teacher-student ratio, and principals’ reports of teacher shortage and how that relates to maths achievement. Secondly, principals’ reports of lack in physical infrastructure and educational resources in their school are examined. Thirdly, principals’ reports of teacher factors that can hinder student learning are presented. Next, students’ reports of teacher-student relationships at school and four teaching practices in maths lessons (cognitive activation, student-orientation, teacher-directed instruction, and formative assessment ) are explored. Finally, this volume examines school principals’ reports of ability grouping practices within and between maths classes.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2014

  • PISA 2012: Series on the Learning Environment Volume III: Student Behaviour

    In this report student behaviour, behaviour demonstrated by 15-year-olds that hinders learning, is put under scrutiny. Students' reports of the disciplinary climate in maths lessons are presented together with principals' reports of student factors that hindered learning at school, and how they relate to maths achievement. Finally student self reported measures of arriving late for school, and skipping class or a day of school are examined.

    Author(s): Michelle Lamy with Steve May, Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: November 2014

  • PISA 2012: New Zealand financial literacy report

    The results of PISA 2012 were released internationally in December 2013, and New Zealand students’ achievement declined in all three domains of the study – mathematics, reading and science.

    The OECD international release of financial literacy results is scheduled for the 9th July 2014. To coincide with this release, the Ministry has undertaken an in-depth analysis of financial literacy in New Zealand.

    This report looks at New Zealand achievement in an international context, the relationship between financial literacy and student background such as gender, ethnicity, immigrant status, language spoken at home, and economic, social and cultural status, as well as students’ own experience with money.

    Author(s): Lynne Whitney, Steve May and Michelle Lamy, Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: July 2014

  • PISA 2012: Top line results for New Zealand

    Mathematical literacy was the major focus in PISA 2012 and reading and scientific literacy the minor focuses. Financial literacy was also assessed and we will not know the results until 2014.

    Author(s): Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: December 2013

  • What is PISA

    The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is an international study that assesses and compares how well countries are preparing their 15-year-old students to meet real-life opportunities and challenges.

    This study is an initiative of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD].

    Author(s): Research Division, Ministry of Education

    Date Published: December 2013

  • PISA 2012: New Zealand Summary Report

    This summary report provides an overview of New Zealand results for mathematics, reading and science in an international context. In addition this report looks at the overall trends in New Zealand achievement for each of these subjects as well as for priority learners (Māori, Pasifika and low socio-economic students).

    Author(s): Steve May, Saila Cowles and Michelle Lamy, Research Division, Ministry of Education.

    Date Published: December 2013

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