Publications

Developing communities of mathematical inquiry

Publication Details

Case 1, ‘Developing communities of mathematical inquiry’, illustrates how two teachers developed teaching practices that were highly effective for diverse learners. The case focuses on how these teachers accelerated the mathematics achievement of their year 4 to 6 students, most of whom were Māori or Pasifika.

Author(s): Ministry of Education

Date Published: Only released on Education Counts March 2011

Endnotes

  1. Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London: Routledge.
  2. ‘Mathematical argumentation’ refers to the process of resolving mathematical disagreement by examining the premises of the different positions to establish which outcome is correct. There are constructive ways of doing this, and students need teacher guidance and modelling.
  3. Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London: Routledge.
  4. The case explains how the teachers used the Mathematics Communication and Participation Framework to scaffold the development of mathematical communities of inquiry amongst the students.
  5. Mullis, I., Martin, M. O., & Foy, P. (2007). Findings from IEA’s trends in mathematics and science study at the fourth and eighth grades. In collaboration with J. F. Olson, C. Preschoff, E. Erberber, A. Arora, & J. Galia (Eds.), Index of students’ perception of being safe in school (SPBSS) and trends, (p. 367). United States: TIMSS & PIRLS International Study Center.
  6. This is not the school’s actual name.
  7. This section draws from The New Zealand curriculum (Ministry of Education (2007). The New Zealand curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media.) and, in some cases, the parallel document, Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (Ministry of Education (2008). Te marautanga o Aotearoa. Wellington: Learning Media). It includes quotes and paraphrases from pages 8, 9, 10, and 30 of The New Zealand curriculum.
  8. An ‘inscription’ is a tool or artefact that symbolises an idea and helps organise mathematical thinking. Examples include graphs, diagrams, and the number system itself. See pages 127–135 of the Effective pedagogy in mathematics/pāngarau BES for further explanation.
  9. The students were attempting to solve the problem presented in Case 1, Appendix 4, page 15.
  10. The koosh balls were soft balls that did not roll but fitted into the students’ hands.
  11. A ‘solution strategy’ is a strategy to solve a specific problem.
  12. Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London: Routledge.
  13. Hunter, R. (2007). The Mathematics Communication and Participation Framework: An outline of the communicative and participatory actions teachers facilitate students to engage in to scaffold the use of reasoned collective discourse. This framework was informed by the work of: Wood, T., & McNeal, B. (2003). Complexity in teaching and children’s mathematical thinking. In N. L. Pateman, B. J. Dougherty, & J. Zilliox (Eds.). Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Vol. 4, pp. 435–443. Honolulu, HI: ME.

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