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Te Rau Awhina: - Good Practice Examples of Māori and Pasifika Private Training Establishments

Publication Details

This study was designed to investigate the practices of nominated Māori and Pasifika Private Training Establishments (PTEs) in relation to teaching & learning, and programme design & development. It also investigated for what reasons the nominated Māori and Pasifika PTEs used the strategies they did to develop teaching and learning. It asked what cultural elements were interwoven into their practices, and finally, to what extent the practices of the nominated PTEs compared with those considered in the literature to be indicators of good practice.

Author(s): Dr Jane Marshall, Kathryn Baldwin and Dr Roger Peach

Date Published: June 2008

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Introduction

This study was designed to investigate the practices of nominated Māori and Pasifika
Private Training Establishments (PTEs) in relation to teaching & learning, and
programme design & development. It also investigated for what reasons the
nominated Māori and Pasifika PTEs used the strategies they did to develop teaching
and learning. It asked what cultural elements were interwoven into their practices,
and finally, to what extent the practices of the nominated PTEs compared with those
considered in the literature to be indicators of good practice.

Key findings

  • The three key components to creating a holistic, ‘good-practice’ Māori/PasifikaPrivate Training Establishment (PTE) were:
    • adopting the surrogate whānau/aiga concept
    • creating a sense of belonging
    • creating a sense of greater humanity.
  • The third theme closely resembles the Māori theme of inclusivity.
  • Tutors play a pivotal role in influencing the attitudes and efforts of learners.
  • Good-practice tutors were seen as being flexible, committed, having a passion for
  • teaching, being focused on the learners, and able to motivate them.
  • The needs of students were generally paramount in driving the development of
  • the PTEs. Student needs included academic, personal, social, and whānau
  • needs.
  • To meet student needs, the PTEs adopted flexible course structures and timings.
  • They also developed individualised learning plans, and used one-on-one
  • learning. They also encouraged student reflection and feedback.
  •  The four key organisational characteristics of good-practice PTEs were:
    • the characteristics of managers
    • having a robust Quality Management System
    • recruiting, developing, and supporting high-quality tutors
    • maintaining good external relations. 

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