Pathways over the transition to schools: Studies in family literacy practices and effective classroom concepts for Māori and Pasifika children

Publication Details

Two outcomes of research and development are described in this report. One is the development of a set of resources suitable for family literacy education. The second is a set of research goals involving Māori and Pasifika families.

Author(s): Lavinia Turoa, Ema Wolfgramm, Lonise Tanielu and Stuart McNaughton, Auckland UniServices Limited.

Date Published: January 2002

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Executive Summary

Two outcomes of research and development are described in this report. One is the development of a set of resources suitable for family literacy education. The second is a set of research goals involving Māori and Pasifika families.

A socialisation model was used to guide the development of video and written resources. The report also describes relationships between research and development, policy development with national agencies, national and local dissemination and evaluation. We contributed to the preparation of over 17,000 booklets and wall friezes in English, Māori and Pasifika languages. Our programme also contributed to the `Feed the Mind' campaign involving 400,000 resources and advertisements on television. The training video was used in the successful intervention reported in Phillips et al (2001).

A model of effective teaching to enhance connections between teachers and students over the transition to school was developed using research descriptions of Māori children and classroom teaching. The model identifies instructional and learning processes of incorporation and awareness as central to effectiveness. It also identifies the vehicles of a wide curriculum, versatile activities and properties of instructional language as central to building connections.

The last section describes literacy practices in Tongan and Samoan communities. The descriptions highlight the need to support and regrow the telling of stories in families. Increased story telling is aided by access to high quality early childhood education and the availability of appropriate books.

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