Publications

Ngā Haeata Mātauranga - The Annual Report on Māori Education, 2008/09

Publication Details

Ngā Haeata Mātauranga is a series of annual reports that monitor the achievement of government’s key priorities for the education success of Māori learners.

Author(s): Education Information and Analysis Group / Group Māori [Ministry of Education]

Date Published: May 2010

Organisational Success

Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 focuses on monitoring progress in achieving the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008–2012 from July 2008 to December 2009.

This section reports on progress in the Organisational Success focus area of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

Success for Māori students is the responsibility of everyone in the Ministry of Education. The effectiveness of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success depends on how all staff within the Ministry and other agencies incorporate it in their daily work – not just Māori staff or staff working in the Ministry’s Group Māori.

There are two key aspects to increasing the effectiveness of the Ministry in ensuring ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’:

Transformation of thinking, which begins with the Māori Potential Approach. This approach, developed by Te Puni Kōkiri, requires a move away from focusing on problems and failure to focusing on making the most of opportunities for success.

Overarching strategic intent

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008–2012sets out the Ministry of Education’s approach to achieving educational success for and with Māori through to 2012. The overarching strategic intent of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success is:

‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’

The six goals of the Organisational Success focus area are for the Ministry to:


Goal  1Provide strong leadership among government agencies for Māori education
Goal 2Be better informed and communicate better with the education sector and within the Ministry itself
Goal 3 Build its capacity and confidence to lift performance for, and with, Māori
Goal 4Embed Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in all Ministry business planning processes and documents
Goal 5Use evidence deliberately to focus decisions and investments on what works for, and with, Māori students
Goal 6Continue to invest in relationships with iwi, and national Māori education groups
 

Transformation of action, which begins with a commitment that all work and all decision-making in the education sector will focus on what will make the most difference for Māori education success.

Contents

This section includes:

Summary of progress against the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success targets and actions.

Discussion about each goal including:

  • Why is this goal important?
  • What progress has been made?

Ministry of Education Statement of Intent 2009–2014

The Chief Executives of all six government education agencies are committed to collective strategic leadership to ensure that Government’s priority outcomes for education are achieved. The priority outcomes inform the operating intentions of each agency.

The key priority for the Ministry of Education as an organisation is that it is capable, efficient and responsive to achieve education priorities. The success of this priority will be ensured by:

  • Concentrating the Ministry's efforts on effective targeting of interventions and levers in order to bring about system change
  • ongoing efficiencies in Ministry expenditure and greater assurance of cost benefits on significant expenditure
  • effective use of evidence in policy development
  • a better integration of policy advice, operational policy and implementation
  • Ministers and central agencies expressing confidence in the Ministry's advice.

Key Ministry actions will therefore focus on

  • improving value for money
  • increasing internal efficiencies
  • improving responsiveness
  • reducing compliance costs.
  •  

Summary

This section summarises progress in achieving the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in the Organisational Success focus area.

It reports on achievement of:

  • targets
  • actions.

Targets

Achieving Organisational Success requires supporting people in the Ministry to increase their confidence and ability to connect with Māori, so they know why, where, and how to focus work to get the best outcomes for and with Māori.

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success sets out targets to monitor the Ministry’s achievement of its goals for Organisational Success:

  • include, as a priority, reference to improving Māori student outcomes in Ministry letters of agreement with other agencies
  • all staff have learning and development opportunities on using evidence of what works for, and with, Māori
  • make research evidence on what works for and with Māori students easily accessible by staff
  • include a commitment to use evidence to focus decisions and investments on what works for and with Māori in all staff performance agreements
  • include a commitment to increase the use, knowledge and understanding of te reo and tikanga Māori in all staff performance agreements
  • implement the Iwi Relationships Framework
  • use Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success to identify priorities in all business plans
  • targets and measures yet to be developed are to build the Ministry’s capacity and confidence to lift performance for Māori students
  • measures of Organisational Success will be finalised to enable the Ministry to be better informed and to communicate better with the education sector and within the Ministry itself
  • targets and measures will be informed by the outcomes of an annual staff survey.

Actions


Table 38: Outlining the goals and actions of the Organisational Success focus area.
GoalActionProgress
  July 2008–December 2009
Goal 1
Provide strong leadership among government agencies for Māori education
Incorporate Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success priorities into Ministry of Education priorities and all agreements with other agencies for their activities and servicesMāori enjoying education success as Māori is one of the Ministry’s key priorities as set out in its Statement of Intent 2009–13
In 2009, all letters of agreement with other agencies included reference to implementing the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. All agencies undertook activities to support Māori enjoying education success as Māori in their Statements of Intent.
Goal 2
Be better informed and communicate better with the education sector and within the Ministry itself
Develop and implement communications strategies to increase effective sharing of information that will lead to a step up in the performance of the education system for Māori studentsThe Ministry has used the Education Gazette to promote Māori enjoying education success as Māori. The Ministry began to summarise the key findings of the Best Evidence Syntheses to publish on the Ministry website from 2010 for educators, parents, families and whānau and wider communities.
In 2008/09 the Ministry improved its website to make important educational information more accessible. Developing Ngā Haeata Mātauranga as a web document with a printed summary also makes information more accessible to the sector.
The Measurable Gains Framework is being developed to identify progress against the goals and targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. Key messages about progress will be published online in 2010 for internal and later, external audiences.
Strengthen Ministry leadership and relationships across government and across the education sector, emphasising the importance of making substantial educational gains for Māori students a priorityThe Ministry developed an Organisational Potential Group to focus on implementing and monitoring Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. This group includes representatives from the education agencies as well as from the Ministry of Education.
Goal 3
Build the Ministry’s capacity and confidence to lift performance for, and with, Māori
Develop and implement a Māori human resources strategy to build the Ministry’s capacity, confidence and capabilityMinistry of Education senior managers will be appraised on how they implement Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. A professional development programme to strengthen cultural cognition will enhance staff knowledge of the Treaty of Waitangi, the Māori Potential Approach, and key evidence of what works for and with Māori in education success.
An Organisational Potential Framework has been developed to support teams in identifying their current capability and seeing the progressions required to strengthen their contribution to ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’. The Organisational Potential Group members have developed an action plan for 2010–2012 for all business groups. The action plan has clear goals and activities for how they plan to build capability and capacity.
Create more opportunities for Ministry staff to work with Māori teams within the Ministry and stakeholders, and build the capability of managers to be effective in bringing about change for and with MāoriA ‘Cultural Cognition’ professional development programme is being developed to strengthen each individual’s understanding of why the Ministry (and Government) has a focus on ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’, and what that means personally and professionally and to connect and apply it to all their work.
Special Education has introduced and trained staff on Te Hikoitanga: Pathway to Success, its bicultural responsiveness strategy to improve service delivery. Schooling Group has developed a Treaty of Waitangi Workshop exploring the Treaty’s application in 2010 as a State servant. People and Business Capability have developed the cultural cognition skills and knowledge framework to be rolled out throughout 2010, along with a pilot of an online Treaty of Waitangi module with links to korero Māori language sites. Early Childhood and Regional Education has been developing the skills and knowledge of their frontline staff who work with parents, families, whānau and local iwi.
Goal 4
Embed Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in all Ministry business planning processes and documents
Develop tools and processes to support business planning which leads to improved outcomes for Māori studentsAll groups included how they contributed to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success goals and how to measure this in their 2009/10 business plan. All groups have an action plan for 2010-2012.
Strengthen monitoring and reporting processes on improvements in the education system for Māori studentsThe Ministry’s Education Counts website reports progress against nine of the targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.
The Measurable Gains Framework is being developed as a way to coordinate data and evidence that demonstrate progress against the goals and targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.
Goal 5
Use evidence deliberately to focus decisions and investments on what works for, and with, Māori students
Focus research and evaluation on student achievement rather than the implementation of programmes, and improve the use of evidence for developing policyCommitments to use and build evidence have now been incorporated into the performance agreements of group managers, and many new initiatives are using this evidence. In 2009, the Ministry began and completed a number of research projects designed to increase the evidence about effective teaching and learning for Māori students.
Strengthen Ngā Haeata Mātauranga to report on improvements in the education system for and with Māori and develop additional approaches to share evidence and progressNgā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 has shifted its emphasis from a stocktake of activities to monitoring the effectiveness of the Ministry of Education and others in education in achieving the goals, actions and targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.
Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 has been developed as a web-based document to enable links to be made to up-to-date information about progress.
Over the next year, the introduction of the Measurable Gains Framework will enable the 2010 report to provide a more substantive picture of progress.
Goal 6
Continue to invest in relationships with iwi and national Māori education groups
Support developing and implementing iwi and Māori organisation partnership education plans that align with the priorities of Ka Hikitia – Managing for SuccessIn 2008/09, Whakapumautia, Papakowhaitia, Tau Ana was introduced as framework for conducting excellent relationships between the Ministry of Education and iwi. It will be implemented in 2010.
There has been an increase of 13 new iwi relationships to a total of 32, with 10 more potential iwi relationships under discussion.
The Ministry also progressed relationships with national Māori education organisations including Te Matatini, Ngā Kura ā Iwi and Te Ataarangi .

 

Discussion

The goals and actions for the focus areas of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success have been based on what evidence tells us makes the most difference for student achievement and in particular, outcomes for Māori students, families and whānau.

For each Goal from the Organisational Success focus area, this section discusses:

  • Why is this goal important?
  • What progress has been made?
  • Conclusion

Looking Ahead

In the next year the Ministry will continue to focus on actions to enhance education success for Māori. The key focus will be giving effect to ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ as one of the Ministry's six priorities for 2009/10. The priority aims to ensure that Māori students are supported to reach their full potential and are informed and guided to make effective transitions from school to tertiary education and work.

Work programmes to achieve this are in action across Ministry groups in 2009/10 with progress monitored through regular reports on outcomes.

The Measurable Gains Framework is central to monitoring outcomes for Māori and the overall success of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

In 2010, the Ministry will continue to develop the Measurable Gains Framework, engage with cross-sector groups to gather information and improve alignment with other cross-Ministry initiatives to implement Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success and existing reporting mechanisms.

The Ministry will also develop key messages from the information from the Measurable Gains Framework that enables progress to be identified.

This is one of the continuing actions for the Ministry around developing and communicating evidence, data and information to enable the effective targeting of investments to bring about system change and improve outcomes for and with Māori.

The Human Resources team will build on its skills and knowledge training analysis from December 2009 to develop a draft Skills and Knowledge Framework in 2010 to guide managers and staff on how to start building their capability and capacity. The framework will be rolled out in 2010.

All business groups have an action plan known as the ‘organisational vision and pathway’. The pathway sets out clear goals and targets for each year from 2009 to 2012.

Each pathway is individual, based on the business drivers of the group and on Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. For example, some business groups will focus on Goal 5     Use evidence deliberately to focus decisions and investments on what works for, and with, Māori students, and  Goal 6 Continue to invest in relationships with iwi, and national Māori education groups for 2010/11 whilst others (such as People and Business Capability) will have a focus on Goal 3, Build Ministry capacity and confidence to lift performance for, and with, Māori.

All have the recurring theme of lifting capability and capacity, along with continuing to embed and review goals in business plans relating to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

In early 2010, the work of the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office will continue to ensure that the priority of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ is embedded in all of the Ministry’s work through implementation of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The Office will end its work in April 2010, by which time everyone within the Ministry should be proactively reflecting the priority of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ in all their work and the most appropriate teams within the Ministry should be taking responsibility for specific actions and activities related to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

In 2010, the Ministry’s Human Resources team will finalise work on a framework for the development of skills and knowledge of te reo Māori and tikanga in the Ministry and then roll this out across the Ministry through the members of the Organisational Potential Group.

Work will continue on ‘cultural cognition’ skills development and evaluated after implementation to ensure that it has a positive outcome for Māori learners.

Ka Hikitia –Managing for Success has three key targets which require the development of further targets and measures:

  • targets and measures yet to be developed are to build the Ministry’s capacity and confidence to lift performance for Māori students
  • measures of Organisational Success will be finalised to enable the Ministry to be better informed and to communicate better with the education sector and within the Ministry itself
  • targets and measures will be informed by the outcomes of an annual staff survey.

Key projects for the New Zealand Qualifications Authority in 2010 will include the development of criteria to:

  • register and approve qualifications and courses based on mātauranga Māori
  • assess the capacity and capability of providers to deliver an approved course and/or National Qualifications Framework qualifications based on mātauranga Māori.

The New Zealand Qualifications Authority will implement a Strategic Māori Capability Plan including operational initiatives to increase Māori capacity within the Authority. It will also investigate taking up formal NCEA and National Qualifications Framework assessment opportunities at events such as the Ngā Manu Kōrero – Māori Speech and the National Secondary Schools Kapahaka competitions.

In 2010, Career Services Rapuara will develop new and revised career planning group programmes for Māori in light of findings from the Whānau Decision-Making Pilot Programme.

The Education Review Office (ERO) is in the final stages of editing a national report on ‘Success for Māori’, due for release in 2010. This report includes information from education reviews undertaken in terms 3 and 4, 2009, about what was happening for Māori students in their learning, progress and achievement in mainstream schools.

The Education Review Office also has a national report due for release on ‘Success for Māori students in early childhood education’. This report follows on from the pilot published in 2009. The report is based on information from 576 early childhood services, reviewed by ERO during term 4, 2008 and terms 1 and 2, 2009. It contains information on how services identify and respond to the aspirations and expectations of parents and whānau of Māori children, and on how services respond to Māori children’s potential to become competent and capable learners.

In all its reviews, ERO has an ongoing focus on what is happening for Māori children and students, and it will continue to ask questions and gather and analyse information about this focus.

For 2009/10, the New Zealand Teachers Council has commissioned or is continuing the following projects to support quality teaching in all settings and in initial teacher education:

  • stage two of the Whakamanahia te Reo Māori research programme. A literature review has been commissioned with the aim to enhance Māori-language proficiency of graduates of Initial Teacher Education programmes
  • the development and inauguration of a kaupapa-Māori-based Induction and Mentoring programme through Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi
  • the development and implementation of a bilingual set of Registered Teacher Criteria that includes the requirement for all teachers to demonstrate the knowledge, values and practice appropriate to the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Key Challenges Ahead

Key challenges ahead for the Ministry of Education will include:

  • ensuring that all its activities and investments take into consideration what works for Māori students
  • enabling all staff to understand the imperatives behind the strategic objective ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’, and understand their roles and responsibility for Māori education success.

A major challenge will be maintaining the focus on ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ as a priority for all work.  By 2010, everyone within the Ministry should be reflecting the priority of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ in their work, and the specific actions and activities of implementation, monitoring and reporting related to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success should be fully embedded in Ministry processes and priority-setting.

Critical to this is the development of more robust ways of monitoring the success of initiatives, both in terms of the original project design and brief, its implementation and the collation of outcome information. This is essential to enable the Ministry to draw some conclusions about its effectiveness for and with Māori.

The Measurable Gains Framework needs to become a key mechanism for reporting of, and accountability for, outcomes for Māori students. Ensuring it operates effectively and smoothly will be a significant challenge.

Likewise, the role of Ngā Haeata Mātauranga needs to be stepped up as a reporting mechanism on Organisational Success and a basis for Ministry self-review, evaluation and reflection.

Once effective monitoring mechanisms are fully in place the Ministry will really understand what is working, where best to invest, and whether it is effective in ensuring ‘Māori enjoy education success as Māori’.

 


 

 

Goal 1: Provide strong leadership among government agencies for Māori education

Why is this goal important?

Solutions to complex problems, and seizing opportunities to improve outcomes, are more likely to happen where organisations share their expertise, operational capabilities and relationships. The Ministry has an acknowledged leadership role in the sector, which includes coordination with other sector and government agencies and forums to achieve shared goals through agencies’ work programmes.

The effectiveness of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success depends on how all staff within all education agencies incorporate it in their daily work. The Ministry therefore needs to provide strong leadership through its relationships with other education agencies:

  • Tertiary Education Commission
  • NZQA
  • NZTC
  • ERO
  • Career Services

One of the key areas of leadership for the Ministry is in the collection and analysis of data and education research, on which the rest of the sector can draw for decision-making.

Deputy Secretary for Education, Rob McIntosh, has responsibility for the development and implementation of strategies in the Ministry. He considers that ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ is an integral dimension of all Ministry activities.

“It comes at the start of everything – not as an add-on or a tick at the end of a process or developing a piece of work. First focus on success for our students and then on our own approach – that’s the order to apply. We must consciously and consistently ask ourselves and others: How is this going to work for and with Māori?”

October 2009


Developing the 28th Māori Battalion website – An example of collaboration amongst agencies

The Ministry has played a key role in the development of the new 28th Māori Battalion website in collaboration with Te Puni Kōkiri, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, the National Library of New Zealand and the Battalion Association.

The 28th Māori Battalion was part of the second New Zealand Expeditionary Force during World War II. The Ministry has had a significant role in ensuring that the deeds and the memory of the 28th Māori Battalion are preserved.

The new website is a place to record, remember, honour and maintain information and knowledge about the Māori Battalion and its outstanding contribution to Aotearoa New Zealand.

The Ministry contribution included developing resources for students, aligned to key areas of The New Zealand Curriculum.

What progress has been made?

Action: Incorporate Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success priorities into Ministry of Education priorities and all agreements with other agencies for their activities and services

‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ is one of the Ministry of Education’s key priorities as set out in its Statement of Intent 2009-2014

In 2009, all letters of agreement between the Ministry and other agencies included reference to improving Māori education success in the context of the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The commitment to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success by all education agencies is evident in the number of actions of the key agencies included in other sections of Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09. In addition to those activities, agencies have undertaken internal work to build capability and accountability.

Tertiary Education Commission

In 2008, the Tertiary Education Commission adopted a specific performance measure against its strategic objective to “ensure effective investment decisions achieve quality outcomes for students and value for money”. This measure was:

  • Investment Plans reflect priorities outlined in The Tertiary Education Strategy and Investment Guidance for Māori.

The completion of the first annual tertiary-education-organisation-level and sector-level monitoring reports showed participation for Māori had been maintained and there had been some improvement in successful course completion rates.

The Tertiary Education Commission’s annual report demonstrates the participation of Māori in Tertiary Education. These results are tracked over a period of years to allow for progress to be monitored.

The Tertiary Education Strategy and Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success both aim for success for and with Māori. The Tertiary Education Commission aims to achieve this through the following programmes:

  • Industry Training – where Māori participation was around 18% for 2008
  • Modern apprenticeships – where Māori participation was around 15% for 2008
  • Youth Training – where Māori participation was around 45% in the period March 2008 to February 2009.

Further information on TEC site

The New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA)

In 2008/09 the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) established Ngā Kaitūhono, an advisory group made up of recognised experts in Māori culture, language and knowledge. The purpose of the group is to ensure the NZQA’s approach to Māori knowledge is compatible with Māori values, consistent with Māori expectations, and complementary to its validation processes.

In 2009, Ngā Kaitūhono in association with the NZQA Board hosted Hui Mana Tohu Mātauranga. The hui focused on how quality mātauranga Māori leads to higher educational achievement for Māori learners. The hui included the NZQA, wānanga, universities, institutes of technology, polytechnics, Māori private education providers, kura kaupapa Māori, kōhanga reo, industry training organisations, and government sector agencies.

As a result of the hui, implementation of the 16 key actions in The Māori Strategic and Implementation Plan for the New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2007-12 (Te Rautaki Māori) is being streamlined into four focus areas:

  • Wāhanga Pūnaha (quality systems)
  • Wāhanga Mana Tohu (qualifications)
  • Wāhanga Whakapakari (capability)
  • Wāhanga Whānau (relationships and engagement).

NZQA also continued to host the Māori Economic Development Forum which provides advice to NZQA about its contribution to accelerating Māori economic growth and capability. The forum includes representatives from industry, tertiary education institutions, Māori businesses, rūnanga, iwi, Māori community agencies, Māori enterprises and Māori service provider organisations.

Te Rautaki Māori – The Māori Strategic and Implementation Plan is the New Zealand Qualifications Authority’s key strategy on how it will contribute to key Māori outcomes through its core business. Consistent with the direction of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, the nature of those contributions includes:

  • quality-assured qualifications that will contribute to:
    • Māori succeeding as Māori
    • Māori learners being able to engage successfully in professional, vocational and industrial activities, nationally and internationally
  • enabling access by Māori communities, iwi, hapū, and whānau to old and new knowledge necessary for their advancement as Māori
  • an increase in Māori capacity and capability through quality educational and training qualifications.
  •  

The Education Review Office (ERO)

The Education Review Office’s strategic approach to advance Māori achievement is to strengthen its partnerships with iwi and the community, build its evaluation capacity, participate in cross-sector initiatives, and develop its internal capability. Four key strands have been identified to advance this approach:

  • strengthening identity – building ERO’s own skills and knowledge to deliver its evaluation objectives in the sector
  • strengthening understanding – building ERO’s understanding and application of the principles of The Treaty of Waitangi
  • strengthening evaluation capacity – using ERO’s partnerships to build evaluation capacity within the sector
  • strengthening relationships – building the ERO’s partnerships with Māori, iwi, whānau, government agencies, schools and early childhood services.

To develop a more strategic approach for improving education outcomes for Māori, the Chief Review Officer, ERO kaumātua and an internal reference group developed He Toa Takitini – Outcomes for Māori: Strategy and Implementation Plan.

There are three key components to this strategy:

  • it recognises ERO’s key partners in the education sector and identifies an overarching objective that ERO will strive to achieve in tandem with them
  • it outlines a planned approach to making this objective a reality by outlining a framework of key focus areas for ERO at which to target its resources
  • it documents the success criteria by which ERO can assess whether the approach adds value to delivery.

The strategy will be supported by internal professional development and a working plan, which details short- to medium-term business initiatives.

Maintaining and strengthening relationships

In 2008/09 the Education Review Office (ERO) has continued to maintain and strengthen relationships with key organisations such as Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust and Te Rūnanganui o Ngā Kura Kaupapa Māori through regular meetings and discussions.

The Chief Review Officer, ERO kaumātua and senior managers have developed, strengthened or maintained relationships with iwi representatives from the Waipareira Trust, Te Atiawa, Tūhoe and Ngai Tahu. The meetings enable both parties to discuss matters of common interest and share information about respective roles.

He Toa Takitini – Outcomes for Māori: Strategy and Implementation Plan

He Toa Takitini enables the Education Review Office to align itself to the objectives of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. Consistent with Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, incorporating the strategies and practices that uphold the rights of Māori and support the exercise of tino rangatiratanga will help Māori learners to:

  • work with others to determine successful learning and education pathways
  • excel and successfully realise their cultural distinctiveness and potential
  • successfully participate in and contribute to te Ao Māori
  • gain the universal skills and knowledge needed to successfully participate in and contribute to Aotearoa New Zealand and the world.

Underpinning their services to Māori is Career Services Rapuara Services’ internal Māori strategy. This provides key priorities which shape its direction and level of engagement.

The key themes of Career Services’ Māori strategy are to:

  • establish and maintain meaningful relationships and effect partnerships to increase understanding of how Career Services can support the career aspirations of Māori and provide career guidance to achieve their potential
  • ensure the development and nature of its services and resources are underpinned by professional career practice that is culturally appropriate and delivered by staff who engage with Māori to meet their career management aspirations and needs
  • ensure that policy, service and resource development is informed by research, evaluation and experience that ensures Māori career planning needs are effectively and appropriately met.

Career Services has also worked closely with the Ministry of Education and Te Puni Kōkiri to pilot and evaluate a programme to support and understand the decision-making processes of whānau Māori. The Whānau Decision-making Pilot Programme consisted of three whānau cohorts, starting in March 2009 and finishing in November 2009. Some key initial findings are the importance of:

  • building networks and relationships with whānau and rangatahi (whakawhānaungatanga)
  • the importance of kura Māori and schools for education in career guidance
  • building education sector capabilities to better meet the needs of whānau.

New Zealand Teachers Council, Te Pouherenga Kaiako o Aotearoa

The New Zealand Teachers Council provides professional leadership in teaching, enhances the professional status of teachers in schools and early childhood education and contributes to a safe and high-quality teaching and learning environment for children and other learners.

There is a strong correlation between the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success goal of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ and the Council’s goal:

‘to support provision of quality teaching in Māori-medium settings’.

The Māori-medium Advisory Group provides strategic advice to Council around that goal.

In addition to the leadership and guidance offered by its Māori-medium Advisory Group, the Council maintains close liaison with the other key educational agencies in order to realise the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success that are complementary to the Council’s own goals and are encapsulated in its whakatauki:

Ū ki te ako, tū tangata ai apōpō.

Excel in teaching so our learners will excel in the future

The Council has initiated a series of projects focused on three key entry points to the teaching profession that support the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success:

  • selection  for Initial Teacher Education (ITE)
  • graduation
  • moving  from provisional to full registration

The aim is to influence and enhance the quality of pouako/teachers throughout their careers and, through that, enhance the learning outcomes of students.

Council projects around the first entry point, selection for Initial Teacher Education (ITE), include:

  • the revision of initial teacher education programme approval processes and programme requirements for all teachers
  • research into the issues of developing and assessing te reo Māori proficiency of graduates from Māori-medium ITE programmes
  • the requirement that ITE programmes are aligned to the Graduating Teacher Standards, which include the requirement for all graduating teachers to demonstrate knowledge, values and practice appropriate to the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

The second entry point is on graduation, when graduates are provisionally registered and entitled to be employed as a teacher. Council action here focuses on supporting quality teaching in Māori-medium settings. This involves:

Upon successfully completing the required induction process, teachers can be endorsed to move from provisional to full registration, the third entry point in the career path. Council work around this involves:

  • the revision of standards and assurance processes for granting full registration and renewal of practising certificates. The new standards (Registered Teacher Criteria) include the requirement that all teachers are able to demonstrate knowledge, values and practice appropriate to the bicultural context of Aotearoa New Zealand.

These criteria also apply to teachers when they renew their practicing certificate every three years.

Commentary

The Ministry has been focusing on its leadership for ensuring ‘Māori enjoy education success as Māori’ since Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success was introduced in 2008.

Other agencies are also taking their responsibilities seriously, both in terms of building internal capability and taking direct actions that impact on the sector.

 


 
 

Goal 2: Be better informed and communicate better with the education sector and within the Ministry itself

Why is this goal important?

Realising the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success primarily depends on using and acting on evidence of what works for and with Māori in all of the Ministry’s work.

This means making research evidence on what works for and with Māori easily accessible by staff. It also means using feedback from iwi and Māori education groups to inform the Ministry’s work on Māori student achievement.

The Ministry is focusing on facilitating greater understanding of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success and aligning all iwi and Māori organisation partners’ education plans with the strategy.

To implement Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, the Ministry must communicate better with iwi and Māori education groups, including developing new ways of working together.

Tailoring responses to local requirements

Responsiveness to the need for culturally-appropriate practices led a Group Special Education staff member to initiate a whole new way of assessing the speech and language requirements of Māori students in the Māori-immersion unit of a local school. A request by the deputy principal for a child to have a speech and language assessment in te reo Māori began an investigation about how best to assess the learning requirements of children in Māori-medium settings.

This process included:

  • obtaining a cultural profile of the student
  • liaison with whānau and Māori staff at the school
  • sourcing culturally-appropriate assessment tools and resources.

After indepth research and discussions with some Special Education staff, a Speech and Language Therapy Te Reo assessment that had been developed in 2003 was modified to ensure it was relevant to the child and the Māori-immersion unit at the school

The new tool was tested with 20 children, and the team concluded that it is most appropriate for students who go through the existing programme and are continuing to experience difficulty with speech and language.


What progress has been made?

Action: Develop and implement communications strategies to increase effective sharing of information that will lead to a step up in the performance of the education system for Māori students

In 2008/09 the Ministry of Education has been promoting ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ through a series of features in the Education Gazette. It also developed relationships with Māori families and iwi through regional and national office staff.

The Best Evidence Syntheses provide a rich source of evidence to inform decision-making and education practice. In 2008/09 the Ministry began to summarise the key findings. These summaries will be published on the Ministry website from 2010, making the evidence accessible for educators, parents, families and whānau and wider communities.

In 2008/09 the Ministry has been improving the Ministry website to provide more seamless connections and better access to information for both staff and the public. Key changes have include moving the Ka Hikitia - Managing for Success  and Education in New Zealand websites back to the main Ministry site. Information for parents and families has been moved from the Team-Up and Te Mana sites back to the Ministry site.

In addition, the development of this report Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 as a web document with a printed summary is designed to make information more accessible for the sector.

National Standards: better reporting to parents

Between May and July 2009, the Ministry undertook consultation with parents and families on the National Standards, focusing on what parents and families wanted from school reporting on their children’s learning.

Feedback from parents, families and whānau said they:

  • think it’s very important to help their children to learn and are involved in helping them learn
  • found the reports in the consultation materials were easy to understand, generally liked the sample learning plan, and particularly liked the concept of Next Steps and the ongoing partnership between home and school
  • want clear, honest, specific and regular feedback on their children’s progress, achievement, and strength and weaknesses in language they understand
  • want regular feedback on their children in a variety of ways, so learning problems are identified early – although there was comment that this might mean more work for teachers
  • want good communication and strong relationships with teachers as part of working together to support their children’s learning
  • want good information about the National Standards, school assessment systems and teaching approaches so they can support their children’s learning
  • need suggestions and help from schools so they know how to support school-based learning in everyday life.

This feedback, along with that given by teachers and others working in the education sector, will help to advise schools about how best to report to parents, families and whānau on student’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards. It will also help schools with their reporting to the community on the school’s overall progress in relation to the standards.


Action: Strengthen Ministry leadership and relationships across government and across the education sector, emphasising the importance of making substantial educational gains for Māori students a priority

In 2009 the Ministry created an Organisational Potential Group to focus on implementing and monitoring Ka Hikitia–Managing for Success.  This group include other education agencies

In 2009 the Ministry developed the Organisational Potential Framework to strengthen organisational and sector ownership, leadership and accountability for the success of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The purpose of this framework is to:

  • support groups and teams to identify their current state, and to see the progressions to strengthen their individual and collective contribution to ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’
  • provide a guiding, evidence-based approach to how they can strengthen their contributions.

Commentary

The Ministry of Education has invested considerable effort during 2008/09 in increasing understanding within the Ministry of the reasons behind and purpose of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, as well as in increasing responsibility and accountability of staff for giving effect to its principles and actions.

Work to provide better information for the sector has progressed more slowly. The summaries of the Best Evidence Syntheses will help to make research findings more accessible to public audiences.

Once finalised, the Measurable Gains Framework will provide a vehicle for conveying information about progress and evidence to Ministry staff as well as the wider sector.

 



Goal 3: Build the Ministry’s capacity and confidence to lift performance for and with Māori

Why is this goal important?

Success for Māori students is the responsibility of everyone in the Ministry of Education. Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success proscribes supporting people in the Ministry to increase their confidence and ability to connect with Māori, so they know why, where, and how to focus work to get the best outcomes for and with Māori. It is not about special treatment but rather professional treatment.

The ability of all staff in the Ministry to work confidently and capably for and with Māori to improve education outcomes is critical to the success of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. The responsibility for the strategy sits with everyone in the Ministry.

Implementing Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success

In 2008, Paul Goren, an Axford fellow from Chicago, spent six months studying how Ka HikitiaManaging for Success has moved from policy into practice. His findings (Goren, 2009) provide a strong platform for future work implementing Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

Goren concluded that implementation needs as much attention as policy development: “Creating opportunities for implementers to make sense of new directives and requirements is more conducive to improvement than merely requiring school professionals to meet compliance requirements.”

Goren set out key actions for Ministry staff if Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success is to meet its intended goals by 2012. These actions include:

  • designate five to seven high-priority actions to work on, with specific tasks, both in the Ministry and in the field in each of the next three years
  • engage outstanding teachers and principals across the country with school-based expertise and a track record of progress on Māori student achievement, to lead professional development opportunities and learning conversations on Māori achievement for teachers, principals, and Boards of Trustees, as well as for Ministry staff
  • convene focus groups of Māori students, along with non-Māori students, to understand the issues both groups face in school and to examine what leads to successful school experiences for Māori students
  • provide ongoing support for programmes that have excellent outcomes for Māori students in schools
  • maintain a relentless focus on Māori student achievement, especially through the gathering and analysis of formative and summative data
  • ensure that the Measurable Gains Framework initiative stays on target to produce data aligned to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success intended outcomes
  • conduct more formative implementation reviews, similar to this report, on an annual basis to examine what is working, what is stalling, and what might need to be recalibrated to achieve the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success
  •  

What progress has been made?

Action: Develop and implement a Māori human resources strategy to build the Ministry’s capacity, confidence and capability

The Ministry of Education’s Human Resources team focused on this goal for the last quarter of 2009 and the first quarter of 2010. Building upon the analysis already undertaken by the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office, Human Resources undertook a Ministry-wide skills and knowledge training analysis in December 2009 to gauge managers’ knowledge of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, and the support they needed to embed the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success thinking, research and evidence base into their day-to-day work.

The evidence provided by the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office and Human Resources’ own analysis showed that the majority of managers and staff in the Ministry are aware of Ka Hikitia –Managing for Success and are seeking support to ensure that they appropriately embed the goals into their day-to-day work.

As a result a draft Skills and Knowledge Framework will be developed in the first quarter of 2010 to guide managers and staff on how to start building their capability and capacity. The framework will be rolled out in 2010.

The Human Resources team has also developed a revised Group Manager Performance Appraisal Tool that includes a critical area of ‘leadership, direction and delivery’.

Within this critical area is the measure ‘execution of programmes and effect on outcomes’. Senior managers will be measured on their results, deliverables, and changes they have effected to implement Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success, and ultimately on how the work they do influences ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’.

A professional development programme is also being introduced by the Ministry’s Human Resources team for managers and staff across the Ministry to strengthen their cultural cognition – by enhancing their knowledge of the Treaty of Waitangi, the Māori Potential Approach, te reo Māori, Māori contexts and key evidence of what works for and with Māori in education success.

Managers will be supported to assist their staff to give effect to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

In 2009 the Ministry developed the Organisational Potential Framework to strengthen organisational and sector ownership, leadership and accountability for the success of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The purpose of this framework is to:

  • support groups and teams to identify their current state, and to see the progressions required to strengthen their individual and collective contribution to ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’
  • provide a guiding, evidence-based approach to how they can strengthen their contributions.

Action: Create more opportunities for Ministry staff to work with Māori teams within the Ministry and stakeholders, and build the capability of managers to be effective in bringing about change for and with Māori.

The rollout of training on Te Hikoitanga, Special Education’s bicultural responsiveness strategy, was begun for all staff during 2009. This strategy was developed to give effect to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. In 2009, a total of 106 Te Hikoitanga workshops were run for all Special Education staff. All staff were supported to improve their knowledge of the Māori language, as well as made aware of:

  • the need to be culturally responsive
  • the tools and resources to help responsiveness
  • the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi
  • how to confront difficult questions and issues related to working in Māori contexts with a solutions focus.

In response to the challenge posed by Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success to transform the performance of the education system for Māori, Special Education has developed principles that will be embedded in its practice. These principles are that its work will be:

  • coordinated and collaborative
  • evidence-based
  • engaging with families/whānau
  • culturally affirming.

Special Education is using these principles to strengthen its support of Māori learners and make Māori services accessible to Māori clients.

By consulting with the local Māori community, Group Special Education specialists can provide special education support that is culturally-responsive and getting to the students that need it.

Special Education is also developing systems and gathering information to build its understanding of the needs of Māori students. For example, Special Education regional offices seek out iwi expertise by networking with local iwi agencies to provide a greater knowledge of Māori services for Māori available to support whānau.

Case study: ‘Step up – reaching the summit’

A new school’s responsiveness to its community is reflected in a close partnership between the board of trustees and local Māori, initiated by the Ministry of Education.

‘Step up – reaching the summit’ is the key theme for the design of Queenstown’s Remarkables Primary School which opened on 4 February 2009. The theme is drawn from Ka Hikitia - Managing for Success and reflected in a prominent tukutuku panel on the front of the school building.

“The environment, community, educational aspirations and spirit of the school are evident in every aspect of its development,” reports Murray Aitken from the Ministry of Education, who has strongly supported the school in being responsive to the needs of its community.

During the very first board meeting, Ministry representative Michael D’Ath suggested the school had a wonderful opportunity to engage with iwi. The board immediately selected an iwi representative, Darren Rewi, to liaise with local runaka (rūnanga) and iwi, inviting input at every level from the design of the buildings to the design of the curriculum.

Relationship-building with whānau, runaka and iwi has ensured the curriculum incorporates the aspirations of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. Te reo Māori and Māori content are fundamental not only to the learning programme but to the students’ physical environment. Māori imagery and icons, developed with runaka and Kai Tahu (Ngai Tahu), are placed throughout the school. Māori as well as non-Māori cultural design elements are reflected in building structures, internal spaces and play areas.

From the start the Ministry was proactive in building relationships with whānau, runaka and iwi. Having an iwi representative and a Ministry representative on the board both with Ngai Tahu whakapapa has helped raise the board’s understanding of Māori needs.

Special Education has also introduced Effective Interventions for Behaviour Challenges (EIBC) as a professional learning course for Group Special Education staff working with children with severe and challenging behaviour. The programme has a bicultural focus that ensures all practitioners work in a way that is informed by tikanga Māori. Participants spoke very positively about the Māori content of this programme.

Analyses by the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office have found that many Ministry staff are struggling to understand why the Ministry is focusing on Māori learners, and how to improve outcomes for and with Māori.

A professional development programme has been introduced to develop each individual’s skills, knowledge and ability to articulate why the Ministry (and Government) has a focus on ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’, to understand Māori contexts and what that means personally and professionally and to connect and apply it to all their work.

These concepts are framed as ‘Cultural Cognition’, developing a better understanding of the Ministry’s focus on Māori learners, and includes two main aspects:

  • an understanding of Māori contexts and experiences (cultural)
  • using that understanding to reflect critically on thinking, behaviour and practice (cognition).

Strengthening understanding of Māori contexts includes increasing understanding and knowledge of:

  • the Treaty of Waitangi
  • Māori potential
  • Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success
  • te reo Māori
  • Māori contexts
  • the key evidence underpinning Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The partnership between Ministry, school and iwi has provided a positive leadership model to the community. ”The interaction the school has with whānau, runaka and iwi is not only the envy of other schools but also a lot of organisations. The support that has been shown to the school will be hugely beneficial to all parties but especially to all the students at the school”, said the new school principal, Deborah Dickson.

Read more about Remarkables Primary School

Applying that understanding includes:

  • making the connection of all work to the Government’s priority of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’, and seeing a bigger picture of how distinct pieces of work fit together
  • building and strengthening mutually beneficial relationships that support a culture of sharing, testing and exploration focused on ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’
  • building personal and collective capability to know what is known and to investigate and seek new ideas, evidence and information and to do so in an effective manner
  • being accountable for outcomes for and with Māori, and for the collective contribution to Government’s Māori education priority.

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office

At the beginning of 2009 the Ministry established the Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success Programme Office to support the Ministry in strengthening its ownership, leadership and accountability for improving system performance for and with Māori. The Programme Office was established until April 2010.

During 2009, the Office worked with key groups across the Ministry to ensure that the priority of ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ is embedded across all work of the Ministry. Its work included:

  • conducting internal analysis, speaking to over 100 managers from across the organisation
  • developing the Organisational Potential Framework and draft indicators, based on what the organisation identified during the analysis, including the need for a focus on wellbeing in addition to ownership, leadership and accountability
  • developing the evaluation approach for ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’
  • leading the establishment of the Organisational Potential Group and supporting its growth and action since it first met in August 2009.

Commentary

Significant action has been taken to provide support and encouragement for Ministry staff to identify areas where they need to build their capability, and to address those with new professional learning opportunities.

 


 

Goal 4: Embed Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in all Ministry business planning processes and documents

Why is this goal important?

To transform the education system to enhance Māori education success, Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success needs to be an intrinsic part of every piece of work of every team in the Ministry.

The annual business planning process determines the priorities for each team, as well as specifying expected outcomes. Integrating Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success into all business plans will highlight its importance for every piece of work for every team within the Ministry.

Case study: Planning for Māori Achievement in the Schooling Group

“Māori achievement in education is a priority for 2010,” says Lisa-Jane Rogers of the Ministry of Education’s Schooling Group, which is responsible for effective teaching and learning in schools.

The Schooling Group’s Māori achievement work programme will sharpen the focus on Māori potential in all activities in order to achieve system change for Māori, with Māori. The programme is part of the implementation of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. It aims to develop new ways of thinking and doing, based on the evidence about what works, to ensure ‘Māori enjoy education success as Māori’.

According to Lisa-Jane, it is a shift away from the focus on failure and blame often used to explain Māori outcomes in education, to a focus on opportunities for success that is deeply embedded in every school. It is also a move away from a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, towards better meeting the various cultural requirements of different communities.

“The change process will take time, planning and critical self-review,” Lisa-Jane says. “Crucial to success will be productive partnerships with parents, whānau, hapū and iwi – beginning with a look at the most effective ways of working for and with Māori in the Schooling Group itself.”

A key focus for the coming year is to develop leaders and teachers who are responsive to the inherent capability and  cultural advantage of Māori students. The programme will also implement National Standards for both English- and Māori- medium systems.

What progress has been made?

Action: Develop tools and processes to support business planning which leads to improved outcomes for Māori students

Information and support were provided to all Ministry teams between March and July 2009 to ensure that each group's business plan was developed with ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’ at the forefront, and that they understood what Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success is and how they can use it to lift system performance. All groups considered how they contributed to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success goals and how to measure this.

For example, the People and Business Capability Group business plan for 2009/2010 includes the key achievement goal:

to implement training that equips Ministry staff with the knowledge to successfully implement strategies that will raise achievement results for Maori.

All job descriptions in the Ministry now have a Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success mandatory key achievement area for staff and managers and the manager core job description also has a leadership component relating to Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The induction process is currently being revamped with a core component of induction into the Ministry being Ka Hikitia –Managing for Success.

A skills and knowledge framework has been developed to be rolled out in 2010. The framework involves learning in the context of seven core components:

  • Māori learning
  • Māori contexts
  • te reo Māori
  • Māori potential
  • Ka Hikitia– Managing for Success
  • the key evidence about what contributes to Māori education success
  • the Treaty of Waitangi.

A component of the skills and knowledge framework is a review of all Human Resources polices in 2010 to ensure they reflect our dual heritage.

Human Resources team commitment

The Human Resources team has taken up the challenge of facilitating organisational change across the Ministry.

The team has identified ‘Change Champions’ to further the thinking, goals and actions of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The Human Resources’ mission statement, vision, and values will be developed in 2010 to build Human Resources capacity, confidence and capability around Ka HikitiaManaging for Success.

The Human Resources’ Organisational Success action plan 2009–10 is being developed with the following key deliverables: 

  • a roll out of cultural cognition training for all Ministry managers in 2010
  • a cultural audit of all Human Resources’ policies
  • all Ministry managers’ and staff members’ performance agreements will include a key achievement area measuring deliverables, results and outcomes for ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’
  • induction training reviewed to ensure Ka HikitiaManaging for Success and the Organisational Potential Framework are core documents for the induction of new managers and staff.

Action: Strengthen monitoring and reporting processes on improvements in the education system for Māori students

The Measurable Gains Framework is being developed as a way to coordinate data and evidence that demonstrate progress against the goals and targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

This information will be analysed in order to make judgements about progress. Key messages about the successes of Māori learners will be published on the Ministry website with links to the data, evidence and programmes reported on.

In May 2009 a cross-Ministry group was established to lead the work on the Measurable Gains Framework, including representatives from the other education agencies. The Measurable Gains Framework is expected to be trialled by mid-2010.

The Ministry’s Education Counts website now contains a section that reports progress against nine of the targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

For example, the graph below tracks progress against the target to increase the percentage of new entrants who have participated in early childhood education to 95% by 2012.

Figure 1: Percentage of new-entrant school children who have participated in early childhood education prior to starting school

Image of Figure 1: Percentage of new-entrant school children who have participated in early childhood education prior to starting school.


Commentary

While Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success has been incorporated into Ministry business plans, the effectiveness of this in practice is yet to be seen. A strong monitoring and reporting system is necessary to provide information on the effectiveness of Ministry actions in achieving the goals of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

The next Ngā Haeata Matauranga will report on progress more fully, providing a basis for Ministry self-review of its effectiveness and for input into the business planning rounds.

 


 

 

Goal 5: Use evidence deliberately to focus decisions and investments on what works for and with Māori students

Why is this goal important?

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success has a focus on supporting the Ministry to better understand both the range of evidence that supports informed decision-making, and also how to use that evidence to focus policy, activities and investments where they will have the most impact.

The growing evidence base from an ever increasing amount of research is providing a more complete picture of what works for and with Māori in education.

What progress has been made?

Action: Focus research and evaluation on student achievement rather than the implementation of programmes, and improve the use of evidence for developing policy

Commitments to use and build evidence have now been incorporated into the performance agreements of group managers.

For example, evidence about Māori student participation in tertiary education has informed the development of the new Tertiary Education Strategy 2010–2015.

Evidence gained from the 2008 Rotorua pilot of Reading Together has now informed the design of the Manurewa Literacy Project, as have the results from the evaluation of phase 3 of Poutama Pounamu.

Evidence from the evaluations of Te Kauhua and Te Mana has informed the approach taken to reporting to parents on the National Standards.

Group managers must also ensure that all staff performance agreements include:

  • a commitment to use evidence to focus decisions and investments on what works for and with Māori
  • a commitment to increase the use, knowledge and understanding of te reo and tikanga Māori.

Tertiary Education Strategy 2010–2015

Dr Andrea Schollmann, Tertiary Group Manager, Ministry of Education has responsibility for tertiary education policy.

“The Tertiary Education Strategy recognises that strengthening identity, culture and te reo Māori are critical ingredients for the success of Māori as Māori in tertiary education.”
 October, 2009.

Māori have the highest tertiary participation rate of any ethnic group, however they are more likely to be engaged in non-degree courses than other ethnic groups. Māori participate in Level 1–3 qualifications at nearly double the rate of other ethnic groups and yet the rate of participation of 18- and 19-year-old Māori students in degree-level study remains at less than half the rate of all students.

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success has several targets directly related to this priority.
 
Key priorities of the new Tertiary Education Strategy 2010–2015 are therefore to:

  • increase the number of young people (aged under 25) achieving at higher levels, particularly degrees.
  • assist Māori to achieve at higher levels.

The new He Kākano professional leadership programme has been based on evidence from the Leadership Best Evidence Synthesis (Robinson et al., 2009).

In addition, phase 5 of Te Kotahitanga has been informed by the emerging findings of the Victoria University of Wellington evaluation of the project (due to be released in 2010).

A key focus for the Human Resources team’s skills and development framework is building the capability and capacity of our policy teams, to give them the skills, techniques and knowledge to build an evidence base of Māori research and consultation. The goal is for all policy development within the Ministry to have an outcome that relates to ‘Māori enjoying education success as Māori’, from the initial development of policy through to its implementation

In 2009, the Ministry began a number of research projects designed to increase the evidence about effective teaching and learning for Māori students. These projects include:

  • Successful Kura – a case-study-based research project that examines the practices kura are undertaking to make them successful, how they are doing it and why it is that the practices are working. Initial results are expected in 2010.
  • Transition from ECE to primary to secondary and from Māori-medium settings to secondary school for Māori students: Indicators of good practice – this research project is looking at indicators of good transition practices in the different settings. Its purpose is to provide good information to whānau and to schools about helping with transition. Results should become available from 2010.
  • Marautanga a kura – a research project looking at case studies of good practice regarding how whānau and schools work together to develop school-based curricula that will meet the needs of their students. Initial results will be available from 2010.

A series of four research projects has examined effective literacy teaching for Māori adults. These will contribute to the evidence base for adult literacy tutors.

Te piko o te māhuri, tērā te tupu o te rākau: language and literacy in marae-based programmes explores the effectiveness of marae-based learning in providing language and literacy for Māori adults. It examines two marae-based programmes at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Hangaia te mātāpuna o te mōhio: learning foundations for Māori adults summarises three research projects that explore how success for Māori adults in literacy, language and numeracy can be built on the foundations of Māori culture and identity.

Mā te huruhuru, ka rere te manu: how can language and literacy be optimised for Māori learner success focuses on how language and literacy can be optimised for potential and existing Māori students at Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec). The focus groups for this project were chosen to fulfil one of Wintec’s strategic objectives, which is to meet Māori and Pasifika educational outcomes and aspirations within the boundaries of Tainui, and to work collaboratively with community stakeholders.

Te pakeke hei ākonga: Māori adult learners explores success in literacy and language learning for Māori adults. It captures the perspectives and voices of learners, tutors and providers in foundation learning programmes. It describes how Māori tutors reinforce and strengthen their Māori learners’ identities through ensuring that Māori tikanga and values pervade the teaching and learning environment.

Five things that make a difference to children’s learning from the Best Evidence Syntheses reports:

Active parental support for children’s learning and well-being

The range of major family and community influences on student outcomes(including the effect of socio-economic status)  is documented on page 175 of The Complexity of Community and Family Influences on Children's Achievement in New Zealand: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration (available on-line on the BES website)

Effective teaching for diverse students

The most important direct education system influence on student learning is the effectiveness of teaching. See the 10 findings of the cross-curricular Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling BES in the Executive Summary on-line. See also online the Executive Summaries of the findings of the following curriculum-specific BESs:

Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2007). Effective pedagogy in mathematics/pāngarau: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.

Aitken, G., and Sinnema, C. (2008). Effective Pedagogy in the Social Sciences/Tikanga-a-iwi: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.

A succinct summary of 10 findings about what is most critical in effective teaching in mathematics is available in the International Academy of Education’s summary of the New Zealand best evidence synthesis: Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2009). Effective pedagogy in mathematics. Educational Practice Series – 19. International Academy of Education & International Bureau of Education Paris. UNESCO.

The most important direct education system influence on student learning is the effectiveness of teaching. See the 10 findings of the cross-curricular Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling BES in the Executive Summary on-line. See also online the Executive Summaries of the findings of the following curriculum-specific BESs:

Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2007). Effective pedagogy in mathematics/pāngarau: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.

Aitken, G., and Sinnema, C. (2008). Effective Pedagogy in the Social Sciences/Tikanga-a-iwi: Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Education.

A succinct summary of 10 findings about what is most critical in effective teaching in mathematics is available in the International Academy of Education’s summary of the New Zealand best evidence synthesis: Anthony, G., & Walshaw, M. (2009). Effective pedagogy in mathematics. Educational Practice Series – 19. International Academy of Education & International Bureau of Education Paris. UNESCO.

Effective professional learning and development for teachers

New evidence is showing the importance of effective professional learning and development for teachers. The Ministry of Education’s best evidence synthesis about effective professional development has also been judged to be the definitive research in this area by the International Academy of Education. A summary of the 10 major findings is available on the UNESCO website: Timperley, H. (2008). Teacher professional learning and development. Educational Practice Series – 18. International Academy of Education & International Bureau of Education Paris. UNESCO.

Implementation of high-impact R & D that creates educationally powerful connections between schools and families through helping parents/whānau to support their children’s learning and teachers to be more responsive to the diversity of their students.

Chapter 7 of the School Leadership and Student Outcomes: What Works and Why Best Evidence Synthesis explains the importance of educationally powerful connections between schools and families. That BES shows some of the largest differences to be made to learning when high impact R & D is used to inform interventions with parents and whanau and teacher professional learning.

Effective school leadership

School Leadership and Student Outcomes: What Works and Why Best Evidence Synthesis. There are 12 findings about what makes a difference in the activities of school leaders.

While school leadership can have more impact across a whole school than any one teacher, the school leadership practices that achieve that impact have to do with promoting and participating in effective teacher professional learning. School leaders achieve their impact primarily through strengthening the quality of teaching.


Action: Strengthen Ngā Haeata Mātauranga to report on improvements in the education system for and with Māori and develop additional approaches to share evidence and progress

Ngā Haeata Mātauranga has reported on the current state of education for Māori since the 1990s. In 2008/09 it has moved away from being a stocktake of activities to monitoring the effectiveness of the Ministry of Education and others in education in achieving the goals, actions and targets of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success. Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 sets out the beginning of system change from July 2008 to December 2009.

Ngā Haeata Mātauranga 2008/09 has been developed as a web-based document to enable links to be made to up-to-date information about progress. This will be enhanced in 2009/10 as the Measurable Gains Framework is implemented.

Over 2009/10, new monitoring and reporting processes through the Measurable Gains Framework will enable the 2010 report to provide a more substantive picture of progress being made to achieve the outcomes sought through Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success.

Commentary

The Ministry is increasingly basing its policies and investment decisions on evidence of what works for and with Māori learners.

The summaries of the Best Evidence Syntheses will help Ministry staff by making research findings more accessible.

The refocusing of Ngā Haeata Mātauranga on the effectiveness of government actions will also help provide information about what works, and what does not, to inform further Ministry decisions.

 


 

Goal 6: Continue to invest in relationships with iwi and national Māori education groups

Why is this goal important?

Ministry–iwi relationships facilitate opportunities for iwi to be full participants in the education system alongside learners, parents, schools and the Ministry. When all these parties work together, much more can be achieved for and with Māori.

The Ministry now has active partnerships and relationships with 32 iwi. These relationships are focused on engaging effectively with iwi to enable them to support their whānau in ways that promote, enhance and advance Māori learner achievement. In addition, the Ministry has a further four relationships with national Māori education organisations.

What progress has been made?

Action: Support developing and implementing iwi and Māori organisation partnership education plans that align with the priorities of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success

In 2008/09, a new approach to iwi–Ministry relationships began to be implemented. This resulted in an increase of 13 new iwi relationships to a total of 32.

Case Study: Moko-Puna Te Ao Kapurangi – Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in action

A new Rotorua early childhood education centre with a distinctive iwi identity is already having positive effects on children’s learning and development.

Open since April 2009, Moko-Puna Te Ao Kapurangi is run by Ngāti Whakaue, a joint project with the Ministry of Education. Ngāti Whakaue has developed a special curriculum for the puna that expresses tribal knowledge and practices.

“Moko-Puna Te Ao Kapurangi is Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success in action. That is to say, an educational project that has at its heart the expression of identity, language and culture as essential for Māori learner success,” says Peter Broughton, Senior Advisor, Group Māori, Ministry of Education.

As a ‘supported playgroup’, the puna represents a new model of early childhood education.

Whānau attend puna sessions alongside their tamariki. The Ministry and Ngāti Whakaue are working together to research the outcomes for children and whānau. Feedback so far suggests the puna is achieving positive effects for iwi identity, Māori language, and engagement of whānau in children’s education.

“Working with iwi in education is exciting and rewarding,” says Peter. “The iwi relationships enable innovative education projects that meet the precise needs of the whānau, hapū and educational settings that they are intended to serve.”

A future step for Ngāti Whakaue is to establish a licensed education and care centre in addition to the puna. By having both, Ngāti Whakaue will be able to better meet the early childhood education needs of different groups of parents and children in an environment that is distinctively iwi-based.

The contracting process with iwi was redeveloped to enable the outcomes to be developed jointly. This better ensures mutual benefits and shared understandings. These changes have resulted in more effective and more positive relationships, and are a clear indicator of system change.

The Ministry also has four other relationships with Māori organisations as well as ten more potential iwi relationships under discussion.

The Ministry also progressed relationships with national Māori education organisations including Te Matatini, Ngā Kura ā Iwi and Te Ataarangi .

This increase in iwi relationships is partly due to the engagement of iwi with Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success during its development, and the basis this strategy provides for conversations about shared education outcomes.

An example of a new way of working is the three-year project recently launched by the Tūwharetoa Māori Trust Board. This project is to assist schools and early childhood centres in the Tūwharetoa tribal rohe to accurately and authentically reflect Tūwharetoa cultural knowledge, language and identity.

This project re-establishes the relationship with the Ministry on a more sustainble basis than in the past.

In the next year or so, iwi relationships will be spread into the rest of the Ministry from their current focus in Group Māori. This will require internal capability building to ensure staff members are able to work effectively in partnership with iwi.

Another example of new Ministry–iwi relationships is the work with Te Taumata Mātauranga o Ngāti Whakaue on a longitudinal (10-year) evaluation into the impact of the early childhood education centre set up by Ngāti Whakaue on tamariki and whānau.

This is innovative not only because of its length (which is intended to follow individual children and their whānau until the children reach early secondary school) but also because it is the only current research that specifically sets out to evaluate the impact on children of being nurtured in an environment that is distinctively iwi-based.

Two teaching and learning resources for eight schools in the Ngāti Whānaunga area have also been developed with Ministry support. These resources will ensure Ngāti Whānaungatanga is delivered in an authentic way by and with the schools in the rohe.


Commentary

Developing stronger relationships with iwi is an area in which the Ministry has demonstrated considerable success in 2008/09. The increasing number of relationships and constructive nature of engagements will contribute strongly to Māori enjoying education success as Māori.

A key challenge will be to ensure these relationships work as well with other groups in the Ministry, not just Group Māori.


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