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Māori student retention, completion and progression in tertiary education

Publication Details

This latest in a series of factsheets on Māori in tertiary education provides information about student loans among Māori students. In addition, an earlier factsheet on Māori participation in tertiary education is now updated with 2004 enrolment data.

Author(s): Tertiary Sector Performance & Analysis, Ministry of Education.

Date Published: August 2004

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Summary

Introduction

This fact sheet highlights the key findings about retention, completion and progression of Māori students in formal tertiary education in the period from 1998 to 2002.

The findings are taken from the Ministry report – Retention, Completion and Progression in Tertiary Education 2003. Please refer to that report for more detailed explanation of definitions and methodology, as well as information about other groups of students.

Retention and Completion

Completion refers to the proportion of students who started a qualification in 1998 who had completed a qualification by 2002.

Retention refers to the proportion of students starting in 1998 who were either still studying or had completed their qualification by 2002. Retention include students who have completed, plus those still studying .

Māori students who started study at a public tertiary provider in 1998 had similar rates of retention and completion overall to non-Māori. However, both retention and completion rates for Māori students were:

  • higher than for non-Māori students in below degree level qualifications, and
  • lower than for non-Māori students in degree level qualifications.

Māori students had higher levels of retention at doctorate level than non-Māori students, but lower levels of completion.


Table 1: Five year retention and completion rates by selected qualification levels
Qualification level started in 1998CertificateDegreeDoctorateAll Levels
Retention rates
Māori students44%49%70%50%
All students34%55%61%49%
Completion rates
Māori students36%39%16%39%
All students30%46%26%40%


Across sub-sectors, Māori students at colleges of education had the highest rates of retention and completion (which was also true for other groups).

Māori students at wānanga had the second highest rates, particularly at certificate level. There has been a significant improvement in retention rates for students who started at wānanga since 1998, coinciding with the growth in enrolments.

Overall, Māori women had higher completion and retention rates than Māori men. However, the difference was much less at postgraduate level. This is a similar pattern to non-Māori students.

Māori students aged under 18 had lower retention and completion rates than Māori students in other age groups. Māori aged 18-24 had the highest retention and completion rates. This pattern is also similar for non-Māori students.

Retention and completion rates for students in private providers are available from 2000 to 2002. Over the three years, Māori in private providers had lower retention rates (28 percent) than Māori in public providers (49 percent). They also had lower completion rates in private providers (24 percent) than in public providers (29 percent). This pattern is similar for non-Māori students.

Progression of Māori Students to Further Study

This section looks at Māori students who completed a qualification in 2001 and the percentage who enrolled in a further qualification in 2002 at the same, lower and/or higher level.

A greater percentage of Māori students (48 percent) enrolled in further study than of all students (38 percent).



Figure 1: Percentage of Māori and all students completing a qualification in 2001 who enrolled for further study in 2002

Image of Percentage of Maori and All Students Completing a Qualification in 2001 who Enrolled for Further Study in 2002.


Māori students at wā nanga were more likely to continue in study than Māori students in other sub-sectors.

Māori students at private providers and colleges of education were less likely to start another qualification than Māori students in other sub-sectors.


Figure 2: Percentage of Māori students completing a qualification in 2001 who enrolled for further study in 2002 by sub-sector in which they completed

Image of Percentage of Maori students completing a qualification in 2001 who enrolled for further study in 2002 by sub-sector in which they completed.


Nearly half of Māori students who completed a certificate in 2001 went on to study for a further qualification in 2002. Of those who went onto further study, around 1 in 3 went on to study at a higher level.

Similarly, nearly half of Māori students completing at degree level went onto further study the following year.

Over half of Māori students completing at honours and masters level went onto further study in the following year, mostly at the same or a lower level.


Figure 3: Percentage of Māori students completing a qualification in 2001 who enrolled for further study in 2002 by level of the completed qualification

Image of Percentage of Maori students completing a qualification in 2001 who enrolled for further study in 2002 by level of the completed qualification.

References

Ministry of Education (2003) Retention, Completion and Progression in Tertiary Education 2003, Tertiary Sector Performance Analysis and Reporting, Ministry of Education, Wellington

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