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Maori Senior Secondary Students Achievement 2004-2006 Factsheet

Publication Details

This fact sheet presents some key statistics on Maori senior secondary students’ achievement in NCEA over the time period of 2004 to 2006.

Author(s): Haobo Wang, Claire Harkess and Michael Parkin

Date Published: October 2007

Introduction

Note that students’ achievement can be assessed in many ways and statistics presented here may differ from other sources. Note also that the calculation basis for the statistics in this paper differs from that used previously (see The Statistics section at the end for more information). 

Key Findings

  • The proportion of Years 11 – 13 students to gain a typical level2  or higher NCEA qualification has increased over the last three years for both Maori and non-Maori.
  • Although non-Maori still have a higher attainment rate, the rate of increase in the attainment over time is higher for Maori than that for non-Maori.
  • For both Maori and non-Maori, females continue to have a higher attainment rate than their male peers.

Participation

Maori Years 11 – 13 students has increased their participation in NCEA over the last three years so that they had a similar participation level to their non-Maori peers in 2006. Especially, Maori Year 11 students’ participation had a large increase between 2005 and 2006.

 
2004
2005
2006
Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13
Maori 83 84 90 84 89 90 91 96 93
Non-Maori 89 89 93 91 91 93 93 95 93
           

Notes: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded; participation is defined as number of candidates (students who have gained at least one credit on NCEA) divided by student roll as on 1 July.

Qualifications

  • Overall, Maori students were less likely to gain an NCEA qualification at the typical level or above than their non-Maori peers. For all students, females continued to be more likely to gain a qualification than males (Figures 1 – 3).
  • The proportion of Year 11 students to gain at least an NCEA Level 1 qualification has increased over the last three years for all groups. 39% of Maori males gained an NCEA in 2006, compared with 29% in 2004. Most of this increase was between 2005 and 2006. Similarly, 46% of Maori females gained an NCEA in 2006, compared with 37% in 2004. Although their non-Maori peers are also more likely to gain qualifications since 2004, the magnitude of the increase is smaller.

Figure 1: Year 11 Maori and non-Maori students to gain an NCEA qualification, 2004-2006

Notes: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded; from 2005, qualifications gained by students who have not paid their NZQA exam fees are included.


  • The proportion of Year 12 students to gain an NCEA Level 2 or higher has also increased steadily over the last three years for all groups. The rate of the increase, at 30%, is similar for both Maori males and females (43% of Year 12 Maori males gained an NCEA Level 2 or higher in 2006, compared to 33% in 2004; for females, the figures were 53% in 2006 and 40% in 2004). Although the qualification attainment rate of their non-Maori peers remains higher, the rate of the increase is much smaller (10% for males and 12% for females).

Figure 2: Year 12 Maori and non-Maori students to gain an NCEA Level 2 qualification or higher, 2004-2006

Notes: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded; from 2005, qualifications gained by students who have not paid their NZQA exam fees are included. 

 

  • Maori Year 13 students, especially males, were less likely to gain an NCEA Level 3 or above than their non-Maori peers. As seen in other year levels, the qualification attainment rate has improved over the last three years for all groups. 27% of Maori males gained an NCEA Level 3 or higher in 2006, compared to 20% in 2004 (an increase of about 40%). The figure was 36% in 2006 for Maori females, compared with 29% in 2004 (an increase of 25%). The magnitude of the increase for their non-Maori peers has been smaller (by 6% for males and 7% for females).

Figure 3: Year 13 Maori and non-Maori students to gain an NCEA Level 3 qualification or higher, 2004-2006

Notes: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded; from 2005, qualifications gained by students who have not paid their NZQA exam fees are included.


  • Maori Years 12 and 13 students were more likely to gain an NCEA qualification below the typical level of study than their non-Maori peers. For example, in 2006 16% of Maori Year 12 students gained an NCEA Level 1 and 21% of Maori Year 13 students gained an NCEA Level 1 or Level 2. The figures were 8% and 11% for non-Maori Years 12 and 13 students, respectively.

University Entrance (UE)

  • Maori students were less likely to meet the UE requirements by the end of Year 13 than their non-Maori peers (Figure 4). Furthermore, males in both groups were less likely to meet the requirements than females.
  • The UE attainment rate has increased over the last three years for both groups with the largest increase seen for Maori between 2005 and 2006 (from 20% to 25% for Maori males and from 28% to 32% for females).

Figure 4: Proportion of Maori and non-Maori students to meet the University Entrance requirements by the end of Year 13, 2004-2006

Note: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded.

Literacy and Numeracy

  • As seen in Figure 5, Maori students were less likely to meet both the literacy and numeracy requirements for NCEA Level 1 by the end of Year 11 than their non-Maori peers. Moreover, females in both groups continued to be more likely to meet both the requirements than males.
  • The proportion of Year 11 Maori students meeting both the literacy and numeracy requirements has increased since 2004. The largest increase was between 2005 and 2006 (from 48% to 57% for males; and from 56% to 63% for females).
  • Of the two requirements, more students met the numeracy requirement than the literacy requirement by the end of Year 11.

Figure 5: Proportion of Maori and non-Maori students to meet both the literacy and numeracy requirements for NCEA level 1 by the end of Year 11, 2004- 2006

Note: Foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded.

The Statistics

The calculation basis for the statistics in this fact sheet differs from that used previously. Here, all proportions are calculated with a denominator of student roll. However, previously a denominator of candidates (students who have gained at least one credit) was used. To enable student roll to be a reasonable denominator, foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are excluded from ethnic group statistics (since foreign-fee paying and NZAID students are a separate “ethnic” group in student roll, but not in the achievement data).

Attainment of all national certificates on the National Qualifications Framework by senior secondary students is reported here, previously only the National Certificate of Educational Achievement was focused on. By far the majority of senior secondary students gain the National Certificate of Educational Achievement. Additionally from 2005, qualifications gained by students who have not paid their NZQA exam fees are included (these students, however, are not able to be specified at all for 2004). They were specifically excluded from our previous analyses. At the national level, this has minimal effect on trend results.

 

Footnotes

  1. Here, NCEA refers to all national certificates for senior secondary students (for example, National Certificate of Educational Achievement and other certificates on the National Qualifications Framework), but excludes international qualifications (for example, Cambridge International Examinations).
  2. The typical levels of NCEA qualifications are Level 1 for Year 11 students, Level 2 for Year 12 and Level 3 for Year 13. 

 

Related Pages on Education Counts

Other factsheets can be found on the NCEA Factsheets index page.

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